Teflon for Sale or Trade

I have more virgin electrical grade PTFE Teflon round rod than I'll
ever use. Lots of 1-1/2, 2, and 2-1/2 dia; some larger and smaller.
I'd like to get 20%-25% of McMaster price, depending on quantity,
extent of the surplus, etc. The stuff is on McM p.3574
Trades are also good. Right now I'm on the prowl for MT3 and MT4
drills, MT4 and MT5 centers, a D1-6 faceplate, CA (400) size
toolholders.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
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Don't have my McM handy, but goddamm, that stuff must be an arm and 1/2 leg....
Reply to
Existential Angst
Not sure why I need it, but i don't have any. I do have too many drills in that size range. email me what you're looking for karltownsendembarqmail.com
lets trade approximately equal retail values.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Got any 1/8" ?

Reply to
Bob La Londe
Sounds good to me, Karl. I'll email you with more specifics on drill sizes.
There's a few more things I'd like to dispose of you or someone else might be interested in.
B&S and Unitron toolmaker's microscopes B&L stereozoom microscope banding tool and seals big spotfacers/c'bores carbide inserts and cartridges planer gage (Lufkin 901) Mitutoyo digital mic head
Reply to
Ned Simmons
No, it's all at least 3/8", mostly over 3/4".
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Maine
PTFE also has some desirable electrical properties, which, along with heat resistance, makes it a good insulator for some applications. I think the term "electrical grade" is used to mainly to distinguish between virgin and reprocessed (mechanical grade) material. The downside for load bearing parts like rollers is that PTFE is rather soft and not wear resistant.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Ideally, 4MT live and 5MT dead.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
It's used up to the GHz range....not just power frequencies.
Reply to
David Lesher
The lot that the teflon came in also included a smaller amount of this more unusual stuff:
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Reply to
Ned Simmons
I need a stereo microscope, but I doubt I can afford it.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
Ned Simmons wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
I do microwave circuit design, and we use Rexolite a fair amount. It's basically polystyrene, but they have to make it using a special process. The stabilizer chemical used for regular polystyrene is very lossy. I think it's also more heavily cross linked than typical polystyrene. It machines quite well, and doesn't melt as easily as the normal stuff.
The stabilizeer is really critical if you want to store or ship the styrene monomer material. Once it starts cross-linking, it's exothermic. The hotter it gets, the faster it cross-links, and you get a run-away reaction which can easily end up in a fire. Dow chemical had a huge tank of it that took off on them a number of years ago.
Doug White
Reply to
Doug White
Are you willing / able to cut it up into $20 sample kits like Aircraft Spruce does with leftover 4130 tubing? Theirs fit a 12" x 12" box.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
8" long pieces of sizes smaller than 1-1/2 dia would fit in USPS small Flat Rate Box. But I don't have much that's smaller than 3/4" or 1". Give me some idea of your preference and I'll see what works.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
USPS also has a Priority Mail Flat Rate padded envelope (9 x 12+-) for $5. It could be stuffed with larger diams's.
Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
I might use slices off the rod for antenna insulators or repair parts for old broken ceramic or plastic parts in test equipment. All I have now are Delrin and PVC, OK for mechanical parts but lossy at UHF frequencies.
How would you ship the larger material?
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Sounds like little chunky pieces might work for you, in which case $20 worth might still fit in a small FRB, or one of the envelopes Bob mentioned. If short, large diameter plus some slender pieces would suit your needs, I'll look thru the bucket of cut-offs.
Reply to
Ned Simmons

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