Temperature and digital calipers



I would clean the edge of the calipers and see if the roller is slipping. Being cold the bearing may have enough drag to slip on the caliper.
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All three are doing this. Cleaning the edges did not help. A quick blast with a hair-dryer did. I suspect the condensation theory is closest to the mark. It is interesting that the calipers will measure OK up to 2", it is only when you go past that that the error begins to show. I take it that this is because the first two inches of the scale are protected by the housing during storage.
It's not a big deal as long as one is aware of it.
--
Michael Koblic
Campbell River, BC
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Michael Koblic wrote:
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--Winston
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Michael Koblic wrote:

That was a storage suggestion for your calipers.
If the problem really is condensation, you would be able to use your calipers full range, out of the box without needing the hot air gun.
Seems like a smart young guy could do the same thing with a Tupperware container and a little hand vacuum pump for almost No Money.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber474
:)
--Winston
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Michael Koblic wrote:

Is the 2" point where you may have been holding it in your hand?. I have a Mitutoyo scale and if I hold it long enough at one point then travel the head across there then it will often flag an error, just leaving it for a minute or 2 will sort the problem. I assume it's moisture from my hand on the measuring surface cover.
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No, 'cos I test them straight out of the box without touching the metal. The 2" mark is where the housing ends.
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Dial calipers are nearly always reliable, as long as they're kept clean and not dropped. Requiring no batteries is a feature.
Readings to .001" usually aren't a problem, with reading glasses if needed.
Dial models generally have a numbered scale showing inches in tenth-inches, or mm/cm for metric models, so counting turns isn't required.
You've brought up a potential problem for many digital caliper users, I hope I remember the issue if I encounter it.
--
WB
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