temporary rust protection

Are there any favorite oily things I can apply to things like lathe chucks
that will keep them from rusting but not require big deal cleanup when I
want to use them again?
I'm not pleased with rusty fingerprints on stuff that's been set aside for
a while, nor do I want to slather them in awful greases and then have to
clean it off again later before use.
there's some stuff called "beoshield" which is wax dissolved in something
oily + a solvent that sounds exciting on paper, but I'm not sure if traces
of it left on ways for a lathe is good or not, or how it will react with
the other oils that will get splashed on there anyways.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
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Have not heard of Boeshield causing any problems compatability-wise. Product of Boeing Aircraft research.
Reply to
clare
My favorite is liquid floor wax. But I have not idea of how effective it is. I like it because there is no big mess and I got a gallon at a garage sale for about 50 cents.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
Boeshield.
Beoshield protects Beosword, "Hrunting".
I like LPS-3 outdoors and Rustlick 631 on machine tools.
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I have two gift bottles of scented bath oil with flowers in the jar. To use them up I squirted some on the log splitter to oil the beam. It spreads out well to wet the entire surface but doesn't prevent overnight rust.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Here in the desert..its about 12% humidity in the summer..but in the foggy winter..its very very wet.
I generally use automotive paste wax. Like you..I bought a dozen cans at a yard sale and its been working fine for many years.
Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
Living in one of the wettest places on Earth and having done a couple of trials on rust protection this is what I find:
1) T-9 Boeshield very good but expensive 2) Mobile One 15-50W good if the protection is relatively temporary 3) I did not have very good results with paste wax alone 4) LPS-3 very good but messy and smelly
Michael Koblic, Campbell River, BC
Reply to
mkoblic
Cydrome Leader wrote in news:k4nidg$cqj$ snipped-for-privacy@reader1.panix.com:
See if you can find a copy of this article:
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They liked LPS 3 as a long term solution, & didn't think much of Boeshield. I don't have an online subscription, and my hardcopy is buried someplace. One of the top choices was CRC 3-26, which McMaster sells. Haven't had a chance to try it yet.
There was another article that touts Camillia Oil, but I don't recall seeing that one.
Doug White
Reply to
Doug White
LPS-3 works well, collects dust and gives you greasy fingers. There are several similar alternatives to Rustlick 631 which is what WD-40 could have been if they hadn't stopped too soon. It dries harder, dust doesn't stick, and it feels like a thin film of soap.
The thermoelectric dehumidifier from HD kept the shop humidity below 80% and nothing rusted this summer, despite frequent 98% humidity outside. My fingerprints don't rust steel anyway, though they darken brass.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
is this lps-3 just the latest version of whatever lps-2 is? there seems to be a non-spray can version, which what I'd want. I don't care for nasty mists and everything else getting coated in stuff.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
LPS-2 is oily, for indoors, and LPS-3 is waxy, for outdoors. I kept an anvil outdoors for years covered with LPS-3, never a speck of rust.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus30841
BIG SNIP
more SNIP
LPS 1& 2 & 3 came on the market about the same time, over 45 years ago in my recollection. And while they do come in open containers, and using anything that isn't a spray is good...... there doesn't seem to be much "overspray" with any of the LPS stuff.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
Reply to
Brian Lawson

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