Threaded Tapers

Hi guys,
I've seen pictures of threaded tapers being machined on lathes and was
wondering what the hell use they are? I mean, since the diameter of
the threaded section is constantly varying, what can it possibly be
screwed into? I cannot imagine any nut or internal thread that would
accommodate such a piece of work.
Kindly disabuse me of my ignorance if you can, thanks.
P.
Reply to
phaedrus
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I saw something like that, on the base of a camera, back in the film days. The threaded taper would atach the camera to a tripod. Other than that, I havn't seen such.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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Hi guys,
I've seen pictures of threaded tapers being machined on lathes and was wondering what the hell use they are? I mean, since the diameter of the threaded section is constantly varying, what can it possibly be screwed into? I cannot imagine any nut or internal thread that would accommodate such a piece of work.
Kindly disabuse me of my ignorance if you can, thanks.
P.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Pipe threads are tapered... It makes it more likely to seal when tight.
Reply to
Stuart Wheaton
Please elaborate further. Pipe taps are tapered, and spring winding mandrels could be mistaken for taps.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
No, it's not a pipe thread; very much steeper taper than a pipe thread...
One such as I refer to appears in South Bend's handbook, How to Run a Lathe at p.82. Sorry I have no facilities to upload a scan of the picture. :(
Jim Wilk> > Hi guys,
Reply to
phaedrus
BTW, is there a FAQ for this group?
Reply to
phaedrus
Pipe perhaps.
Oil drilling pipe tool joints are also taper threaded. Cheers, John B.
Reply to
John B.
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Reply to
wws
The picture in the SB book is just an illustration. Exaggerated to make the setup clear. If you need a to see something modern, threaded with that much taper look at a tapered buffing spindle.
Paul K. Dickman
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman
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44 page booklet. P.82 does not compute. Was it another handbook?
(Unfortunately, I probably can't help you but I'm curious, just the same.)
-- It takes as much energy to wish as to plan. --Eleanor Roosevelt
Reply to
Larry Jaques
No one's mentioned wood screws yet, which are tapered along their length, or sheet metal screws, which are tapered at the nose.
Aren't taps tapered?
Spring winding mandrels -- I never thought of that.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
I once ran a job on a CNC turning center for a threaded taper to make self tapping plugs for leaks in oil pipelines. The plugs were cut from hex stock and then hardened.
The leak was drilled out to one of several standard sizes, the right size plug twisted in, then welded in place.
These were much more tapered than standard pipe threads.
David
Reply to
David R. Birch
I suspect that drawing exaggerates the length to make the taper more evident than it would be on a real pipe tap.
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jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I haven't seen any threaded tapers for tripod-attaching, just 1/4-20 or 3/8-16 straight threads, but mechanical remote shutter releases often have a tapered thread, as clearly seen in following photo.
Reply to
James Waldby
Modern taps aren't really tapered, the threads are just on a tapered shaft (the top of the crest is ground off of the leading teeth, so cutting is progressive and not done all with the first tooth). But, old-timey taps WERE tapered, so you could get any tightness of nut you wanted.
This was important when bolts were made with threading-plate type dies (with poor diameter control) on forged rods (again, with poor diameter control).
Another tapered-screw application is seen on the pilot of auger-type wood boring bits. Yet another, is sometimes seen on citrus juicers.
Reply to
whit3rd
Which reminds me of the puree-ing attachment on our Kitchen-aid mixer, which is a long tapered screw into a conical screen.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
From a mechanical standpoint, a steeply tapered thread is capable of releasing upon a relatively few turns.
Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
"Tim Wescott" wrote
The threads aren't (except for pipe). The taper is a separate grind that creates the cutting edges. Run a nut onto one and examine the free play.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I'll start writing it.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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BTW, is there a FAQ for this group?
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Yes, and still have the strength of something with many threads engaged. This is why it is used on drill pipe and also cable releases for camera shutters.
To answer the OP's second question, the female thread is also tapered.
Reply to
anorton

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