Hello, long newbie questions

Hello, my first post regarding my first lathe.. Managed eventually after many failed attempts at buying a lathe to get a
Myford M Type Picked it up Sunday, chap even knocked the price down when I got there :-)
It came with a selection of gears, tools, chucks etc
Managed to get it installed and gave it all a good clean and it is bearing signs of many years neglect and abuse
The lead screw half nut mech is very vague and stripping the half nut of the lower has revealed that it is very worn and IIRC looked like it has tried to cross thread at some point I have joined the Drummond yahoo group and had a look in the files section where there is a set of diagrams for creating a bolt on half nut to the casting making subsequent replacement trivial
I am certainly in no hurry to get screw threading as I am a novice and realize that there is plenty to get my head round before I will require this feature (not used a lathe since school - which was many many years ago)
I have pondered as to whether it would be possible and easiest to remove the casting, clean up where the threads were and silver solder some material (maybe using tube) and have it re threaded and then mill the top half of the tube away leaving a fresh new half nut?
Can anyone see any problems attempting this?
The bit above the half nut, is this also supposed to be threaded or just a pad to support the pressure of the half nut when engaged? This "pad" bit is bolted through an vertically elongated hole in the carriage, I'm guessing to make it adjustable? does anyone have any info regarding how to set this up correctly? could it be that mine is just mal adjusted as the half nut does have threads , just thinner than the screw's and not square (gone pointy)
Also the tail stock is a morse taper, but which one? (M1 and M2 seem to be common sizes quoted for Myford parts on the bay of e) If I take the chuck off and try and fit the morse attachments I have into it they "seem" to fit but not as nicely as they do in the tail stock,though I didn't try and clean it out before trying so could be traces of swarf and hammerite that seems to have been liberally spilled everywhere, good job they didn't attempt to de grease before doing this as it seems to be coming off easy enough (are they supposed to have an internal morse taper here? again which sort should it be?)
Thanks in advance Apologies for the long first post and if I have used the wrong terminology, I am a newbie and enjoying the learning curve so far...and perhaps still a little too enthusiastic in finding out about this machine
Regards Rob
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Hi Rob
Another good place to find information about your Myford is Ton Griffiths site http://www.lathes.co.uk/index.html
I don't have a Myford, but on the lathes I've worked on, the half-nut (plural intended) are two halves of one nut and they clamp togethe round the leadscrew when screwcutting.
My suggestion is to get hold of an illustrated parts list so you kno what things should look like.
As they are still in business and there are so many Myfords in use getting spares shouldn't be a problem.
Good luck.
Joh
-- jlh4 ----------------------------------------------------------------------- jlh45's Profile: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/member.php?u 955 View this thread: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?tq845
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I assume someone has pointed you to tonys site: www.lathes.co.uk where you'll probably find some answers to your machine specific questions. I would think that both the tailstock and the head stock will have a morse taper, tho not ness the same one, often the headstock is 1 larger.
Dave
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Cheers Dave, Yep lathes.co.uk bookmarked and partly my guide in choosing the Myford in the first place, a mine of info on there I only came across it as I had just missed a Smart and Brown (M) just down the road that went for 100 the day before I found out about it being for sale!! The poor thing had been sat out in the rain for a week, had boxes of collets and what seemed to be a very comprehensive set of chucks/tools and "stuff" in the cupboards so did a google search to see what I had just missed...
mine seems to be on pg13 of the Drummond section, the one in the middle of the page sat on its cast stand
I did email Myford regarding trying to get a direct replacement for the half nut, and it looks like I'm out of luck by a few tens of years :-)
I did spot a NEW leadscrew and half nut on lathes.co.uk , but the price is roughly double what I paid for the machine in the first place ;-) and is kind of out of my league Happy to have a clunker to learn on for now
Perhaps the morse being slightly bigger in the head compared to the tailstock would explain a poor fit? It did go in , but just didn't feel as precision a fit as it did in the tailstock. would 1 size up feel like this or would there be very obvoius "slop"?
Regards Rob
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On Wed, 25 Jul 2007 21:17:25 +0000, Rob wrote:

Rob;
Welcome to the group, I went from here to Locost, you have done the reverse. You will find a wealth on information on here, with regards to Lathes Millers and other tools. Confirm what size the leadscrew is if you have chance.
Cheers
Adrian
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Appologies if this posts twice - I just posted but it disappeared...

I have just checked my recently aquired Myford M-Type and although I have not dismantled it, the top half of the half nut does appear to be a pad as you describe. It definitely does not move away from the lead screw when the carriage is disengaged threrefore it cannot be threaded I think.

I have no idea what morse it is but I can confirm that my machine appears to be the same as yours. Tools that fit snugly into the tailstock taper do not fit nicely into the mandrel taper.
Having just checked the half nut, I think I ought to possibly dismantly and clean the carriage and then reoil. Do any of you guys know what I should lubricate the bed and also the headstock bearings with? - presumably way oil for the bed and saddle but what about the headstock bearings? - I am planning a trip to MaccModels tomorrow so any advice is appreciated.
Regards Martin
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Rob
    If nobody's already pointed it out, the current (August) edition of Engineering in Miniature magazine has a long article by somebody ( John Shrubsole) with an problem identical to yours.
    The lathe, a 1948 Myford 'M' type had a worn leadscrew and the owner describes in detail how he turned the existing leadscrew end for end in order to bring the unworn section at the tailstock end into use with the saddle and clasp nuts.
    There is a planned sequel to describe how he dealt with the worn clasp nut.
    Who's a lucky boy then!
     --
Chris Edwards (in deepest Dorset) "....there *must* be an easier way!"
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Hi Chris, well that is good news :-) Cheers for the heads up for the mag Bit more bed time reading
Managed to swap a beer token for 20cm or so of fat round bar 40mm diameter and had a go at facing it, centre drilling it then turning it down a little
I was getting quite a lot of judderey cuts with some strange markings (wavy not parallel and more like "digs") had a wobble of the bar as I could sense that something wasn't quite right
Noticed quite a lot of play in the bearings with it gripped, so tightened them up till there was no "knocking" that I could sense and took some more cuts and all went a lot better, nice smooth curly swarf and no more judder
I managed to turn the bar down to 32mm cut it off at 45mm (took ages to get through using the parting jobbie and I cheated the last 1/2 cm with a hacksaw) Faced it off, put a nice chamfer on the end and drilled a hole through it Looks like I'm on my way to building the System A toolpost in this months Model Engineers Workshop :-)
Ball turning attachment next ...
Regards Rob
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Rob
    Remember what your mom told ya - 'walk, don't run' Welcome to the Brotherhood! --
Chris Edwards (in deepest Dorset) "....there *must* be an easier way!"
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wrote:

Rob, Again, welcome from from one of the bluntest but what the Hell?
I am glad that you didn't start some damn fool,notion about your machine being expected to behave like a brand new one. So, my friend, move to YahooGroups and join the MyMyford Group. Again, don't expect miracles and whilst you are at it- join the Drummond mob and who else takes your fancy.
Sadly, the best information came- past definite- was in Model Engineer in the days of the First Flood. You want a guy called Kenneth C Hart but he wrote under Martin Cleeve. At a guess, if you have a decent public library or a nearby club get out the ME's from say 1953 and read what he has to say. He had a ML7 and before that a ML2 or 4 and your .'M' is somewhere in between the two.
It's a bit since I read Tony Griffith's stuff but there was a M and a D Myford and the M is Myford and the D is Drummond Bros who were taken over by myford.
I could- but I can't photocopy all the stuff because of constraints by Magicalia who have me by the balls about copyright.
With my usual acidic advice, take my word and follow it up as I suggest.
Cheers
N
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Cheers N, Yup under no illusions that a machine that has possibly been abused since the early 40's is going to produce precision work - esp in the hands of a novice such as myself :-) Still experimenting and working out how much material I can take off and at what speed and with which tool...so many variables
Joined the local library prior to "the purchase" hoping there would be a good "newbie" book, magazines or manuals. Left there dissapointed as they had nothing on the subject at all, will look into the inter-library thingy that they gave a pamphlet on whilst joining up, perhaps other libraries will be able to help Is there an "index" of articles from past ME issues available? Meanwhile I will keep my eye out on the Bay of E
OK MyMyford Yahoo group- signed up awaiting approval, thanks for the heads up Strange when I did a search with the term "lathe" for newgroups/forums I didn't spot that one but did for the Drummond Yahoo Group..
Regards Rob
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Try here http://www.groundlevel.demon.co.uk/me_index.html
Good luck with your new toy. I started out with a 1906 drummond years ago and taught myself not only the basics of swarf making but also what features I did and did not want in a lathe. A few years later I bought a brand new machine which I have had for the last 28 years.
Bob

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Rob Hi, welcome to the totally absorbing world of machining. Ask your local library to get a copy of the Model Engineers Workshop Manual by G H Thomas and the Amatuers Lathe by Sparey, they were both in the system a year or two ago. Both are full of good hints and tips and are worth reading twice at least, I've since bought my own copies but read them first through the library when I was confined to bed for a while. There is a lot of good reading available on the internet but I found these two books superb, the copies my library got for me were well thumbed and a bit grubby - always the best sign in a book.
Regards
Keith
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Thanks to all ..again Managed to use the inter library website and both books reserved also found another lathe book that sounds like it could be a good read Milling Operations in the Lathe Cain, Tubal so reserved that whilst I was at it
Though I suspect that my old "M" will be very limited as to milling capability :-)
Thanks to all once again Regards Rob
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I too searched on Yahoo and only found the drummond group so thanks for the heads up - now signed up waiting for approval.
Regards Martin
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