Tire weight alloy

Anybody know what they're made of ? I need to cast some balls for a ball mill , and have a choice of pure lead or tire weight material . I see
sellers on ebay that have 10% antimony/90 lead for this use , others have pure lead . Still others have ceramic balls , but I'm not sure those have enough weight for a small ball mill . The one thing all have in common is that they're around a half inch diameter . I figger the .490 ball mold for my muzzleloader will work just fine .
--
Snag



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Can't answer the alloy question directly, but tire weight lead is harder than pure lead. I use it for lead hammers & it's much better than pure for that.
Bob
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On 2/4/2015 3:53 PM, Bob Engelhardt wrote:

Oh, wait ... (senior moment): I use Linotype lead for hammers, it is harder. I don't think that wheel weights are hard (why would they be?).
Bob
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On Thu, 05 Feb 2015 08:49:24 -0500, Bob Engelhardt

4-12-84 tin antimony and lead alloy.

They are. They are generally 0.5% antimony and 0.25% arsenic - the rest being lead - and they are heat treated for hardness.

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On 2/5/2015 6:09 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

...

Do you know why they need to be hard?
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On Thu, 05 Feb 2015 20:36:51 -0500, Bob Engelhardt

So they stay tight against the rim and don't bend under centrifugal force. at 1000 RPM on a 15 inch rim, a 1 oz weight weighs 13 1/4 lbs, before it hits a bump.
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wrote:

And need to easily flex to the circumference of the rim

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What causes this up and down of hardness over time?
I finally melted down some wheel weights and made a small ingot for recasting into a hammer. I'm going to try a mold made of sheetrock durabond 90 since I have a sack of the stuff laying around. The trick will be casting the oval hole to fit the wooden handle, and if everything fits after the lead shrinks.
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On Sunday, February 8, 2015 at 3:37:50 PM UTC-8, Cydrome Leader wrote:

Usually these are cast around a knobbed pipe handle. Consider smashing a bit of iron pipe oval, and hammering out a bit of flare, that the wood can really be forced into (without breaking the soft alloy).
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I do see they usually use pipe for handles, but pipe and round rods really suck for hammer. There's nothing like real wood, with a proper profile to make it not only feels nice in the hand, but always be lined up for a nice square blow.
It's a little thing to complain about, but yeah, I really like a solid wood handle.
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On Mon, 9 Feb 2015 18:35:18 +0000 (UTC), Cydrome Leader

Yes but... In most machine shops lead hammers were used to tap things in vises or other holding devices to ensure that they are firmly seated. I've been in shops that used a hand held lump of lead and others that had pipe handled lead hammers.
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Cheers,

John B.
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If I'm the only person in the world with a hickory-handled lead hammer, that's fine by me.
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Cydrome Leader wrote:

After all this discussion I'm going to cast a pair of screw-ins for my plastic mallet . One of lead and one of tire weights . It has a hickory handle ...
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You're probably going to win this race, since I ran out of wax.
The plan is make a hammer shape, then wrap some thin sheet metal around the head of the handle then tighten it up a bit to make a cookie cutter then just melt/press that into the wax to cut out the handle hole and see if sheetrock patching compound can make a mold, melt out the wax and pour in the lead. This old stock handle comes with a selection of wood and steel wedge. I'm not sure what the deal is with local hardware stores and always having a "fresh" supply of 10 to 20 year old stuff on the shelves. It's like they stage stuff in the basement until the boxes finally fall apart, then they bring stuff upstairs to actually sell it. Anyways, the local Ace just got a shipment of some locally made Indestro wrenches. Indestro shut down 25 years ago.
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On 2/9/2015 10:01 PM, Cydrome Leader wrote:

I'm with you ... hickory is the only proper hammer handle. It's SO much easier to cast a lead head on a piece of pipe, but it's something that I can't be satisfied with. YMMV
Bob
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Even German tools are made with American Hickory handles- and they proudly mention this point in sell/spec sheets.
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wrote:

Here is the complete Cook lead hammer kit: http://www.cookhammer.com/make.html The handle fits in the mold through the boss under the clamping screw. You hold the ladle end low while melting the lead, then tilt it up to fill the cavity.
You could hammer a piece of conduit etc into a tubular ferrule that will accept your wood handle and embed it in the mold. -jsw
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This is for a small 1-2 pounder, so the danger factor is low. I've busted sledgehammer handles before by missing, and seen taped up, split handles which is even more scary.
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On Tue, 10 Feb 2015 17:45:16 +0000 (UTC), Cydrome Leader

My neighbor welded a piece of pipe to the underside of his maul head. The pipe is about 4 inches long and surrounds but does not touch the wood handle. So when he misses a strike the pipe strikes the wood, not the handle. Eric
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typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

Dumpster diving for fun and profit.
"Malone called Luce in 2006 after stumbling upon a huge find in the parking lot of Discount Electronics, a local Austin chain. The store was clearing out its warehouse and had hauled everything to the parking lot of its main store on Anderson Lane. Malone focused on the
Discount Electronics had contracted to test. He was still loading them when Luce showed up and walked right past the computers to the photo
printers that often, but they constantly need paper and toner."
    There it is. The way to make money is to sell the supplies to the gold miners.
    (Mys SO was appalled to learn that in some cases, it is cheaper to buy a new printer than replace the ink cartridges. Heck, the Pixma MP500 is $54 to refill at Costco.) -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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