tractor axle


This come under the title, "No good deed goes unpunished"
I told "the Kid" he could have one of my trators after July1 for his hobby
farm. I'm "loaning" him the Ford 3600. The rear wheels on this tractor can't
take wheel weights that he'll need for the snowblower.
So, i said take the wheels and speed rims off the Ford 2000. We proceeded to
change tires and then I realized the speed rim adaptor has never been off
the tractor in the thirty years I've owned it. One adaptor came right off.
The other one, every single stud bolt stripped the threads.
So, I took the axle and brake assmebly out of the tractor. I have to pull
the wheel brearing off to get the axle out to change studs. I just made a
special wrench to undo the 2.75" locknut and then a 25" long extension for
my three jaw bearing puller. It won't budge that bearing. I just gave up for
the day. Any suggestions? This is put together just like any large truck.
All tractors made the same for that matter.
Man, am I sorry I thought to make it easy for "the Kid" snowblowing. This is
his second tractor from me, he inherited the little backhoe a few weeks ago.
Karl

Reply to
Karl Townsend
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Heat, thumping and cussing? Are you trying to get the outer out of the housing, or the inner off of the axle? Or the whole bearing off, so the axle will come out?
So why isn't _he_ doing the work?
Reply to
Tim Wescott
I tried thumping. I quit before trying cussing. I'll do that next. The axle is 1.5" diameter, then just one bearing, then a collar that has the bearing race. I'm trying to pull on the collar to make the bearing slide off the "high spot" on the axle. I'm surprised its a tight press fit cause there was a 2.75" nut on the axle holding the bearing in place.
Don't you have kids?
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Heat, thumping and Kroil, followed by some patience to let it sit a few days while the Kroil does it's magic.
Reply to
Pete C.
:-). 'nuff said.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
It seems that I always forget the magic of heat, until I'm on my third or fourth* go-around -- or unless I'm looking over someone's shoulder, like now.
*
Or the fortieth, sitting frustrated in the middle of a pile of broken pullers, mushroomed drift punches, and thoroughly dinged-up parts
Reply to
Tim Wescott
OK, guys, I'll heat it, beat it, and kroil it. Then walk away for a day. Repeat.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Man. I wish I had someone giving me tractors!
Wish I could help with the rest of the problem.
Reply to
Joe AutoDrill
Yup. But how can we talk Karl into adopting us? And does he ship?
Reply to
Tim Wescott
I suspect Karl wants to be sure there is SOMETHING left of the tractor!!!
Reply to
clare
A quick pass across the bearing with a stick welder will usually get it off except if you get the weld down into the axle shaft. Knock the bearing off while it is still hot.
John
Reply to
john
I have a feeling that "the kid" more than reciprocates. Have you ever seen a more proud dad?
Reply to
Buerste
He got a ton a brownie points a couple years ago when we had our bad car wreck. He dropped everything immediately and drove through two states to rescue us.
karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Any suggestions?
Introduce the kid to filling the rear tubes with calcium chloride solution?
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
That same question occurred to me, and I do have kids ... as in progeny, they're all adults.
Reply to
Don Foreman
1. Heat, Kroil, vibration and patience 2. Hydraulics as in porta-power 3. Some ammonium nitrate packed into the rim ... nevermind.
Reply to
Don Foreman
On Fri, 2 Jul 2010 12:26:50 -0500, "Karl Townsend" wrote the following:
When I hear things like that, I fondly remember the CamPen Marine who had his Dodge towed into the body shop with 5 snapped studs. He said thay were "really _on_ there." I gently told him that the left side of some Dodges had left-hand threads, so he'd know next time. Hopefully, this isn't your case.
My company made at least $1,000 on repairing all the autoexec.bat and config.sys files on Marine computers over the first couple years of its existence, invariably when the young G.I. saved it in Word Perfect format.
Have you tried using a large slide hammer bolted to the (remainder of the) studs or chained to the rim? That uses the bearing itself to evenly pressure the inner race. Last choice is to use a small tip on an oxy torch and warm that inner race so it expands and allows it to slip off. Consider replacing bearings and races if you go that route, although it isn't as much a problem with a low-rpm bearing unless you're utilizing that tractor's power to the fullest extent daily.
I know that this won't work for you, but for other times, the plate-type with wedge blocks works on some model bearings on trucks and cars.
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You _are_ keeping borrowing rights on all these goodies, I trust? Good!
-- The most powerful factors in the world are clear ideas in the minds of energetic men of good will. -- J. Arthur Thomson
Reply to
Larry Jaques
One step better. I have instant recall. A tractor breaks down, he brings the loaner right back. Both these machines are spares for the inevitable breakdowns that only happen when you're swamped with work.
karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
As I told the art teacher who complained that the kilns always break at the end of a semester when they are needed the most. " Things do not break when they are not being used. "
=20 Dan
Reply to
dcaster
If he won't ship apples, I really doubt he will ship tractors ;)
Reply to
Wes

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