unusual threading die adjustment

wrote:


http://www.workplaceinsanity.com/2011/06/what-do-your-customers-really-want.html
I've heard that specifically about the auto industry, but the engineers I dealt with there were new hires brought in as vehicular electronics mushroomed. That business is secretive and no one talked shop. At Segway engineering was very hands-on and aware of production concerns. Other places varied among the individuals.

The teachers I had in various night schools were "night and day" different from the ones in college, since they worked at a real job for a living. In Mitre-subsidized night school I aced the Differential Equations course I had barely passed in college, because he explained it for people who use math as a tool rather than worship it as a gift from Vishnu. In Analytical Geometry all the problems used 30, 45 or 60 degree triangles so the answers included the square roots of 2 or 3, we just had to know where. We learned to do trig and logarithms in our heads without a calculator. Problems at work such as decibel gain or loss and phase shift modulation merely had different numbers in the familiar places. -jsw
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On Wed, 1 Aug 2018 21:42:16 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Yeah, Segway was probably abruptly different from most settings for engineers. My new neighbor was an engineer at Boeing in TX. A white collar engineer/manager, which I found hard to wrap my head around. I'm pretty sure he was a computer/paper/meeting engineer, a different strip than most I've met.

VBG.

Cool.
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wrote:

Actually Segway was pretty typical for a small company begun and run by engineers with an idea. I also helped develop a new color printer concept of the former Centronics engineers and was a tech for new product development at Unitrode.
(Amazon.com product link shortened) When it came out I was working on a very similar LSI-11 mini-computer based Automated Test Equipment project with an equally well-organizd group.We all read the book and saw nothing to change. The Ph.D in charge was a brilliant, easy-going beard, ponytail, sandals, VW bus type who worshipped Feynman.
Just as we completed it the economy tanked, orders for new capital equipment vanished, and the company folded. R&D isn't a secure long-term job.

The pattern I've seen, known, read of or experienced in larger companys was competent engineers being pushed into management to make decisions about what (or not) to develop next, while the engineering grunt work fell upon younger engineers or co-ops / interns who still remembered how to calculate, and technicians like me who knew how to build prototypes of testable, manufacturable working product.
I often began with a pencil scribbled schematic, parts list and verbal description of the desired result. Once my completed schematic had been approved they left me alone to build it however I chose. A particularly hands-on engineer might model the dimensions of patch antennas, RF transmission lines and matching stubs in the circuit board material we had chosen.
A quirk I've noticed in more academic environments is what I call the Artist Colony style of management, in which everyone has a supervisory title and does their own thing independently, without formal coordination. It's effective with a small group of cooperative people, as long as the tasks can be divided without overlaps. Community Theatre productions were like that too.
==I've been cutting and bending 22 gauge galvanized on a 30" 3-in-1 sheet metal machine. It struggles with 22 and 24 would be easier. -jsw
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On Sat, 4 Aug 2018 10:01:17 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Interesting. I wonder what percentage of companies are small (not the SBA's number <500) and run by engineers with an idea. Entrepreneurship is alive and well here, which is good.

Praise Dickey!

Ooh Noo!

Lost the "e" off stripe there.

Not what I expected, but I ran from corporate life after brief exposure. Dilbert's life is real!

The sheer quantity of Good Shit(tm) which first was sketched on napkins and torn pieces of paper never fails to amaze me.

And that works?

Does the struggle leave you with a less-sharp bend, or what? What width stock are you bending?
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wrote:

3/4" angle 24" long, and the bend is tighter at the ends than in the center. I corrected the angles by clamping them in a home made pan brake as a vise and adjusting the angle with a rubber hammer and this: https://www.harborfreight.com/3-inch-hand-seamer-66654.html
They are corner reinforcements for an insulated plywood and foam box for the Alpicool C20 freezer, whose insulation is inadequate in a hot car.
I made the 4' pan brake to form white aluminum flashing to cover my exterior window frames, which I rebuilt in PT wood that doesn't hold paint well. The brake isn't nearly stiff enough to bent 22 gauge steel but it clamps it well.
When I was completed and was adjusting the brake a neighbor stopped by, asked what it was, then when I told him, said I could borrow his 10' Tapco siding brake.
-jsw
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On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 14:05:35 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Thot so.

I have the cast iron version of that from eons ago.

Bueno.

Rat bastid. He waited, eh?
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wrote:

The welded and machined end hinge and clamp assemblys bolt to straight channel, angle and bar stock, so it wasn't recognizable until fully assembled. I didn't know he had the brake, they aren't common homeowner tools. Another neighbor gave me a leftover roll of the white aluminum flashing.
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On Thu, 9 Aug 2018 07:55:54 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

I retract my curse.

This is true, and mfgrs are very, very proud of those brakes.

Nice score.
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