Vacuum pump from refrigeration compressor questions

You say that like it's a -bad- thing, Eric. ;)
- The list of Obama administration disappointments would take three rolls of toilet paper to record. --BMF
Reply to
Larry Jaques
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That is easy for most. Simply an inverted cone - point down - large under area with a hole under it - and covered the hole with sheet - the moisture will form and drip into a cup under the cone. Even in the desert.
I've lived through Loma Preata a.k.a. San Francisco earthquake and many Pacific storms and even Earth day one year - when the zealot blew three legs of a 4 legged dual HV Power transmission line. Knocked out the power for the entire county and killed him when the steel fell on him.
Martin
Reply to
Martin E
Shoot for a year if you can afford it. It will be eaten eventually, and if the S does, truly, HTF, stores won't be back on line for several months. On an island, go for 5 years storage and the DeSal setup.
Solar ovens work. See DIY plans online.
And keep another 100 gallons of tap water in whatever storage containers you have solely to flush the toilet. It doesn't have to be pure, just wet. Toilet mints (chlorine/bromine tablets) are a good idea, too. They allow you more time between flushes without the bathroom smelling like a urinal at a low-rent bar.
- The list of Obama administration disappointments would take three rolls of toilet paper to record. --BMF
Reply to
Larry Jaques
That's a little surprising, but if correct then a vane type AC compressor ought to work fairly well as a single stage vacuum pump. The only thing to watch out for is the vapor pressure of the lubricant, but it's unlikely to be a problem.
hth,
bob prohaska
Reply to
bob prohaska
Use a hose rated for drinking, else you may contaminate the water.
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-jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
If only you could have that time back and use it to earn a living and plan for retirement, eh?
Reply to
Wake Up
What's their consensus on "the great cull?"
"Late summer" (2012)
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Some might be willing to pay a fee for your predictions... so they know what to bet against.
Reply to
Wake Up
And drove about 20,000 miles during the same period, right?
Reply to
Wake Up
Yeah, but what's actually 'good'? Don't only the pro's do stuff like that f or the service or for astronauts or for museums? It seems like food that o ld would eventually taste like a building material or like styrofoam or pol ystyrene. I mean, its not like you'll be eating at the Waffle House. It see ms like it would be just easier to run across to another state where there is food or something.
Reply to
bruce2bowser
You're no more prepared for that than you are for catching up on your rent payments.
Maybe you ought to get your own shit together before making so many apocoyptic predictions. Ya think?
Reply to
Wake Up
In the event of a real long-term emergency, you would have quickly killed (or not) yourselves and extended their lives to die a few weeks later.
Nope. I have a well, and I bought a manual pump for it to replace the electric, JIC.
Yeah, septic, which I just paid $400 to pump.
You had a good situation there. Most places would have had to wait weeks for FEMA to get to them, if they would.
We have lotsa tules up here, but you're right, the quantity of people thinking that way would scare away all the wildlife, anyway, so...
Ditto here.
Ayup.
You being nearly on top of the San Andreas Fault line puts you in pretty deep shit.
Truth! Yeah, I've been doing that for years now, too.
- The list of Obama administration disappointments would take three rolls of toilet paper to record. --BMF
Reply to
Larry Jaques
You don't think Mexico would invade when that happened? So long, SoCal!
You misspelled "hundred million" there, mon. Between people dying from running out of their meds, starving with no food, dying when others take the little food they have, running out of water, dysentery, etc, that figure would happen within a month of an EMP burst which killed the entire grid. It's amazing how quickly supposedly civilized people revert to primitives, given the reactions during Katrina and other bad storms. Most of the real bad news wasn't broadcast.
- The list of Obama administration disappointments would take three rolls of toilet paper to record. --BMF
Reply to
Larry Jaques
...
A friend of mine spent $450 or so on a vacuum sealer unit, after going through several cheaper units. He brings fish back from annual trips to Alaska and packages it to have through the rest of the year. Also vacuum-packs his jerky and sausage made from local elk and moose. His concern is having stuff stay good for the rest of the year, as opposed to decades.
My wife and I package lots of dried foods to take on camping trips, as well as frozen entrees to have when car-camping. Most of what we package is ok for a few years of room-temp storage, which meets our needs.
For prepper-style long-term food storage without flavor loss, get the commercial freeze-dried canned foods I mentioned in a previous post, or spend the time and money to DIY. I think the approach of "run across to another state where there is food or something" is contrary to the usual prepper mindset.
Reply to
James Waldby
"We walked 1000 miles already and to stay here would be death, so why not continue over an unenforced border and take the goods off the wealthy Americans? Let's go." they'd say.
I'm not sure how much seasonal changes would affect that. Dry summers and cold winters might be equally bad for survival of the unfittest.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Why do you asshats put your bumpkin feelings ahead of expert advice?
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"The simple fact is septic tanks are designed to take care of waste
pumping and inspections, a septic system should last decades."
Instead of accepting readily available information, we have one crackpot recommending fairy dust even though his system failed, and another crediting fairy dust for his success. Too funny.
Reply to
Normal Person
Gunner Asch on Sun, 07 May 2017 22:06:24 -0700 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
And the "good news" is that California has known about earthquakes for decades.
Here in the PacNorWest, they keep evidence of serious earthquakes in the past as well as finding faults they didn't know about. Like the one which runs down puget sound and then turns east under the old King Dome. That whole section of Seattle is built on fill, not to earthquake standards. When it cuts loose Elliot "bay" will be a bay again. And that is before we get to the subduction zone off the coast. When that cuts loose (any time between noon and fifty years from now) and a couple hundred miles of fault line gives way - you'll know. Have no doubt - you'll know.
-- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
When we sold our mountain home with a Septic tank and large field after 17+ years of use the pump guy needed help finding the hole, and then he pumped the liquid out and the bottom was clean. The special dish soaps and washer and showers with hair soaps cut any grease that got there and it was consumed. There are soaps that kill natural bio houses in the tank.
Martin
Reply to
Martin E
I've always loved the Murphy Angle on the SAF: When the Big One hits CA, everything east of the San Andreas Fault will fall into the Atlantic. ;)
Do you believe the plumbing (supply and septic) would survive it?
I'll bet. Given a large quake (6+) I doubt those would hold. Maybe a 3.5. ;)
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I've been using septic systems my whole life. Installed two of them myself. Several different leech arrangements, including one dry well. Never did anything other than live normally. Always had a dishwasher and cloths washer. Never used any kind of special soap. Never pumped a tank except when required for selling the home. Longest period without pumping was 16 years. Never had an issue, never wasted a penny on toilet fairy dust.
My current system has an accessible screen in the tank outlet, mandated by code. I checked it after nearly a year. It looked like new, which is what I expect to see every time I check it.
Reply to
Normal Person
Your issue has nothing to do with dry well vs leech field. The fact is that you are an idiot who failed to pump your tank in time, which allowed everything flushed down your toilet to skate over the top of the solids in the tank, and flow right into the dry well, which choked it. You've already admitted it, so there's no sense "The tank was pretty full when it was pumped (850gal) and I believe sludge went into the dry well."
Here is a simple summary of the underlying problem:
1. You live a subsistence lifestyle where things that normal people consider maintenance, you handle on an emergency basis. 2. You spend what little money you have on frivolities. 3. You end up suffering more, and either spending more, or doing without. 4. You give other people asinine advice instead of using that time to fix your own problem.

Reply to
Normal Person

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