[Way OT:] Microwave oven now "Lazy Man" clean

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No, that's not the real reason, which is that it's too easy to spill the food and smear it around, or burn your hand, if you leave hot food in the microwave while you clean.
Reply to
James Waldby
Yes! I must say I am rather proud of it, too.
It's fast, cheap, effective and not outlawed yet, even with 'lemon juice' involvement.
I've borne witness to many a microwaved entree and snack prepared by a healthy cross - section of humanity for breakfast, lunch and dinner over the last three decades.
I have yet to see *one* person wipe down the cavity afterword. Yours truly included.
It's right up there with 'ethics' and 'budget surplus' and 'Santa Claus'.
Nice to contemplate but just a rumor, at best.
So. remove the food first? James! You are a genius! :)
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
Sarin? That would be hard to arrange, as no plastic has significant amounts of both fluorine and phosphorus in it. Phosphorus is rare in plastics. Sarin isn't something that one can make by accident.
But Phosgene? Absolutely, and I've done it. All you have to do is to burn a chlorine containing material in a low-temperature fire.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
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those who would rather not click the link, microwaving plastics does not release cancer-causing chemicals into the food. I am highly skeptical of microwave-heated food-grade plastics killing pet birds.
HOWEVER... overheating a PTFE-coated (long fluorocarbon molecules) skillet on a stove *can* cause decomposition into smaller fluorocarbons, to which birds are sensitive. I'd guess that is the source of the numerous reports.
And other plastics... well, if they're not food dishes, don't put them in the microwave.
Highly, highly doubtful. Sarin, tabun, and soman are all fairly complex organophosphate compounds. Sarin is the simplest: C4H10PO2F. With the atoms in a very specific arrangement; F bonded to P, P double-bonded to O, etc. It's one thing to have the elements present, it's a whole nother thing to get them attached together right.
Reply to
Terry
Or they had to heat the plastic hot enough to produce carbon monoxide. Teflon wire insulation survives a red heat.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Wow, great minds work alike Winston. I've been doing that years, right after tried boiling pasta water in my microwave.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
We should compile the group's 'tribal knowledge' and turn it into an easily - searched database. I bet there are lots of things that we each do that others could benefit from. I'm endlessly fascinated by 'tips and tricks' that make 'nearly impossible' tasks easy.
Ferinstance: I've used the 'boiling water' trick to clear a stopped toilet on three occasions over the years. It beats the heck out of using a snake in terms of speed, effectiveness and pleasantness!
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
Excellent idea, Winnie. You gonna compile it?
Has anyone had their toilet crack in two from this tactic yet? That'd put boiling shit all over your feet and floor.
-- We're all here because we're not all there.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I think I'd also be leery of thermal shocking a toilet... it could do a number on the wax ring as well.
I put in a new toilet a while back that seems to have a smaller than average passageway. It's clogged up two or three times a year since new.
The last couple of times I had the 'pleasure' of dealing with it, I mixed up a strong solution of liquid dishwashing detergent and water... about a quart or so of I'd guess 80% detergent both times.
Said solution is on the dense side and sinks quickly... I kept the bowl nearly full to keep some head pressure on the clog, then after 5 or 10 minutes, the lubed up clog passed.
Of course this won't work for towels, kid toys, root clogged sewer lines and all that. My experience with this technique thus far is extremely limited... but as of now I'm 2 for 2.
It's worth a shot, and beats hell out of piddling with the always loathsome snake.
Hope it saves someone a headache sometime.
Erik
Reply to
Erik
Larry, Erik.
Please consider the porcelain insulators in your truck's engine. Starting on a cold day, they are subjected to ~0 C to ~2000 C once per revolution. They don't crack in normal use, yes?
The technique is to pour the ~100 C water down the center of the bowl, raising the contents to ~50 C or so, lowering the viscosity of the load. It might take 2 or 3 tries for the most challenging ex-chimichanga but it always works, in my experience.
And it won't damage the plumbing.
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
Sometimes hot water works in seconds.
Sure! It is 'way less effective and 'way less pleasant.
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
The head rotted off mine years ago... I'll surely get another first time lubing the clog fails.
I hate snakes...
Erik
Reply to
Erik
Sometimes more than "way les effective". Our downstairs john (of the water saving style) has a design which I guess looked pretty to someone. The hole at the bottom of the visible bowl is sort of square, and there are shallow folds leading down to those corners. The result is that a plunger will not seal, and if you attempt to use it, you get four jets of water with each stroke -- and no pressure to clear the clog.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Spark plug insulators are for real porcelain, and designed for such service. To this day I have difficulty 'wrapping my head' around the conditions they normally operate. I agree, they are one of engineerings great, unsung marvels.
I'm reasonably certain most, if not all toilets are in reality 'vitreous china', and I'll bet money they aren't stress relieved in the mfg process. Too expensive...
Check this:
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Look down near the bottom of the article under the heading 'How They Are Made'
Erik
Reply to
Erik

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