Best way to clean gas tank while in tractor?

More 9N stuff. The gas tank has crud in it. I don't know how much but there is enough to mostly clog the outlet. The old fuel in the tank
just dribbles out. After I get the clog removed and the tank drained I'm thinking about using a pressure washer to clean the tank insides. While the tank is in the tractor. I have a 90 degree fitting for my pressure wand that would allow getting all the insides washed down. Suggestions? Opinions? Thanks, Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can you drain ALL the water out afterwards and dry the inside?
I've left a car gas tank hanging upside down in the sun or three days before soldering a penny over a rust hole.
(Amazon.com product link shortened) -jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

I'd be careful , a tank that old will have thinned/weak spots from rust ... a wide fan nozzle and if you can , drop the pressure a little . All you really want to do is knock the loose stuff off .
--
Snag



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Greetings Terry, The lower pressure is probably a good idea and I can do that with the soap injecting nozzle. I guess if high pressure can blow holes in the tank maybe the tank is too far gone anyway but I don't feel like replacing the tank just now, I wanna wait till the weather gets bad. Thanks, Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, April 28, 2017 at 11:50:29 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

Eric, I believe you're wasting your time with the pressure washer. Tried th at with my '67 MF 135 and the fuel bowl/filter was plugging again in a coup le months with rust. Took the tank to a radiator shop locally that soaked i n a hot caustic tank, cleaned it, and sealed the inside. No worries for se veral years now. If the caustic treatment opens up a hole, you needed a new tank anyhow. Just my .02.
Garrett
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 28 Apr 2017 16:39:54 -0700 (PDT), Garrett Fulton

And after cleaning in the caustic tank, any repair - whether welding, brazing, or soldering, is very simple. Cleaning the tank ON the tractor is a "fools errand" regardless. Pull the tank, pour in a couple quarts of fine sharp gravel, and fill half full of water, then shake vigorously for 15 minutes or so. drain, empty, inspect and repeat as necessary untill the tank is clean. Then get yourself a tank "swish" kit and coat the inside of the tank. A Motorcycle kit will be adequate for a 9N. Just make sure whatever product you buy is hooch resistant. Some of the old style stuff cannot stand up long term to even E5.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, April 28, 2017 at 11:50:29 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

Recently I ran across some articles on the web about zinc and copper plating using vinegar. Have not tried it, but it might be worth pursuing. Zinc might work to prevent more rusting.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 28 Apr 2017 17:10:33 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@krl.org"

I was going to say, if pressure washing it causes a leak I want to know about the rust damage NOW - not after I put over $50 worth of gasoline in it!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 28 Apr 2017 17:10:33 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@krl.org"

Got any links Dan? I have pure zinc bars. Thanks, Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, April 30, 2017 at 1:30:02 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

I did not bookmark the sites. So you can probably find the links as easily as I can. Sorry about that.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

Not really worth the effort. Take the tank off. Dump a couple gallons of phosphoric acid in it and let it set in various positions so the acid can eat the rust away. Order some KwikPoly (http://kwikpolyllc.com /)when you put the acid in. Now drain the crud/acid out. Mix some baking soda and water and slosh it around to neutralize the acid. Now stick the tank out in the sun to dry, or warm it with a heat gun. Now mix a batch of KP and pour it in. You won't need a lot. Move it around so you coat the entire interior. Clean the threads for the outlet very well and let the stuff cure. (I like to color it red or blue so you can tell it's coated) I have yet to find a fuel or additive that chemically damages this stuff once it's cure.
--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Greetings Clare and Steve, I have decided to wash the inside of the tank with the low pressure nozzle and soap with my pressure washer. Then I'll vacuum out the majority of the water while the tank drains. With the tank on the tractor. If the tank leaks then I'll solder them, use the tank but also order a new one to replace it. There is enough room under most of the tank that I could solder up most any leak. I'm good at soldering. I filled a thumb size hole in the top of the radiator tank on this tractor about 10 years ago with plumbing solder. My neighbor said there was no way to solder up a hole that big and that it would need a patch so I opened my big mouth and said I could do it. With a good hot air/acetylene torch the job went pretty fast and easy. Anyway, I can get a new tank total cost when delivered for about $120. But it will need to be painted no doubt because it will either just be primered or bare. So that's why I'll try to fix leaks on the old tank so I can use the tractor while waiting for the new tank to be ready. I would consider plating the inside with zinc but after thinking about it the work and time involved is just too much. This tractor, though made in 1939, is not for me a collector's item but is a tool so I don't care if the tank is original, which is why sloshing is probably not worth the effort either. If I wanted the thing original though I would certainly use your suggestion Steve. Thanks, Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 30 Apr 2017 11:45:32 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

The new tank will in all likelyhood be "terne plated" on the interior. Terne is a Tin /lead alloy used to protect steel from corrosion. - it is basically "tinning" the steel with solder.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 30 Apr 2017 23:25:45 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I always thought Tern plating was when the seagulls pooped on the tractor. Thanks for the "Clare" ification. Cheers, Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.