What can this hydraulic pump be used for?

I know very little about hydraulics. This pump has very many connectors and also an actuator. I am confused as to what it may
possibly do. The original cost is over $8,000.00. It looks to be in a pretty sharp condition.
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/milsurp/hydraulic-pump/
Any ideas? Is it usable in civilian life?
thanks
i
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It looks to me to be a hydrostatic drive pump, or in other words a variable displacement piston pump. What it was for, or what it could be used for now is any one's guess. Without knowing the specifics of the pump it is hard to know what can be done with it. It may take some serious horsepower to run it, or maybe not. Greg
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Yes, that makes sense to me. The federal NSN information says as much, it is a piston pump with actuator.

Thank you. I will open up the actuator box to see if the motor is 400 Hz or 60 Hz.
i
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I took the actuator box apart and found out that there is a 12VDC motor with gears and a screw drive inside. It works, as I learned by applying 12V to the inputs. It spins and shifts the lever.
i
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From the NSN, I found this comment in the Army Maintenance Data File (AMDF): Navy COG: 9Y NAVY-OWNED STOCKS OF MATERIAL MANAGED BY THE ARMY WITHIN THE ARMY COMMUNICATIONS AND ELECTRONICS MATERIAL READINESS COMMAND. NAVY FLEET MATERIAL SUPPORT OFFICE. Which indicates possible Navy owenership of the basic unit. Steve

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| I know very little about hydraulics. This pump has very many | connectors and also an actuator. I am confused as to what it may | possibly do. The original cost is over $8,000.00. It looks to be in a | pretty sharp condition. | | http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/milsurp/hydraulic-pump/ | | Any ideas? Is it usable in civilian life? | | thanks
I'll take a stab at it. The actuator engages the pump drive, so that the pump can be started and run remotely by electrics. That means the gear box is constantly in motion, not like a drive that can be disconnected, but more like a turbine engine gearbox. Perhaps this was for a GSE (ground support equipment) turbine engine? The pump is a two stage pump, with the first pump being a suction pump and the second stage being a pressure stage. Most pressure pumps don't suck very well and suction pumps can't pump up much pressure. The small hose fitting is a drain. I might be wrong because I can't figure out for sure which fitting does what. There is a low pressure inlet, which is the large blue hose fitting. The small hose fitting is a drain, most likely. Next, I don't think it's a hydraulic pump. I think it's an oil pump for engine or other machine lubrication. The first stage is the scavenge pump and the second is the pressure pump. If it were hydraulic the fittings would be stainless, not aluminum, and the hose fittings would be at least aluminum AN type fittings. Usable in civilian life? That's certainly possible. I guess it depends on what you do, what you need, and how good your imagination is.
I'd see if ebay finds it valuable. Put it in the turbine engine parts category. If the end use sticker has FAA/PMA on it somewhere, it has aviation applications.
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Makes full sense to me. The first compartment is the gearbox, and a few lines could be pumping oil through that gearbox just for lubrication.

No idea.

So, this one kind of offers the best of both worlds, is that right.

Okay, I got it. If you want more pictures, I can take some.

Makes sense to me.

Thanks. I will put it on ebay, but I have not decided where or how to describe it. Thank you for yor input, I appreciate it.
i
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I did a search on the NATO Stock Number (NSN): see link http://www.iso-parts.com/Public/Search_NSN_Details.aspx?NSNX95-01-171-3477
5895 class is for miscellaneous communications equipment and the suppliers code indicates it from the signals warfare command center.
It could be some kind drive/control unit for an antenna. What type I don't know.
Someone else can take a shot at it.

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It looks like a pressure compensated Cessna I used to see on cement mixer truck trailer axle assemblies. Similar to this one.
http://tinyurl.com/5g279
http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?UID 05031907304043&item=9-5194&catname=hydraulic
They would run up to 4000 psi but pretty small displacement. Yours appear to be stacked for some special application. Steve
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Looking at
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/milsurp/hydraulic-pump/dscf0001.jpg
That's three pumps, the right side is a variable displacement pump, and can move a lot of horsepower. The left side is likely a fixed displacement piston pump for implements. In between in a little plate will (well, should) be a small charge pump to keep the big one full. That little black elbow at the top of the photo ought to be the charge pump's intake. The black box is the actuator to vary the pump's displacement, but it's an odd way of doing it which I've never seen before. Military people.... The steel line across the top should be a case drain to let pressure from the big pump dump to the case of the little one. The fitting that's obscured behind the actuator at the bottom of the photo on the left end of the pump should be a case drain back to the reservoir. The tiny fitting at the back of the pump is just a drain to let out any oil that gets up behind the valve in the back of the pump. That valve is likely a relief valve. That arrangement is used pretty often on personnel lifts, small excavators, and other self-propelled equipment that only moves around intermittently. Though they usually use gear pumps as the implement pump rather than a little piston pump. You could probably take the implement pump off the back and repurpose it as a motor. Add a couple of relief valves and replace the actuator with just a lever and you'd have a spiffy little hydrostatic drive. Would make a damn nice go cart! If you play with it, remember that cleanliness is next to godliness with hydraulics. And hit up Vickers for any info on pressures and recommended hookup.
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On Sat, 19 Mar 2005 08:44:35 -0600, B.B.

Thank you. I saved your post, it is very nice. It makes full sense to me. I will try to talk to its manufacturer if possible. It looks like a very cute piece.
i
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