What is a "second operation" lathe?

Ebay has a couple of 'second operation' lathes. One is a Hardinge and
the other is . Don't think either has an automatic feed.
Can anyone tell me why these are called 'second operation' lathes?
Thanks,
-- Harm
Reply to
H. Buger
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Second Op lathes are used to do secondary machining operations on a part that has already been roughed out or that requires operations that could not be done during the initial machining cycle. Mostly a production tool. Usually lever feeds, sometimes with a turret containing several different tools. Probably not what you want if you have to ask. Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
Thank you, Trevor Jones! I would like to learn machining. I figure I would start with a lathe and then graduate to a milling machine. I haven't really the slightest idea of how to start. Suppose I'll get lathe and an electrical box with plans on how to build a rotary phase converter that an electrician sells on Ebay if I need three phase power.
Thanks, -- Harm
Reply to
H. Buger
"H. Buger" wrote Suppose I'll get
Skip buying the plans, there is plenty of free information on the net to build either a static or rotary converter, if you keep your eyes open you might be able to get a static pretty cheap
Google on " build 3 phase converter".
Here is the first listing.
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Carl Boyd
Reply to
Carl Boyd
If you don't have a machine yet, don't worry about whether you need three phase or not yet. Three phase converters come up here all to frequently, though it is my personal opinion that when I need tthree phase, I will likely buy a variable frequency drive (VFD). Do it yourself rotary converters are a good option for the larger machine, but not really cheap to build unless you have good scrounging abilities, or a well stocked junk pile. Cheaper to build than buy, if you are at all competent with electricity, though.
There's a PILE of machines out there. It just does not seem like it, most of the time. Especially when you are actually trying to find one. :-)
First thing I would do, is to post where you are. What country? What area? Pretty good odds of finding someone near you that may be able to point you towards a good local source. Some areas are better than others. Sometimes you just have to bite the bullet and pay the freight to get what you want. Don't be too quick to discount buying new. As much as the Chinese made tools get hacked on for being a "pre-assembled kit" they are often useable as-is, if a bit rough. Often, they are much better than their reputation might have folks believe. Much of the used North American made machines are old enough to draw social security, or older. They might have been well taken care of, or they might be worn out and suffering from a lack of attention or abuse over the years. Parts can be an issue, though there are sources for new parts for several of the old brands, and used parts can often be found if needed. It helps if you can find someone that can help you look over a prospective purchase, if you are unfamiliar with things to look for.
It would also be a good idea to figure out what you want to do or make with the lathe. Do you want to make small engines? Clocks? Rebuild parts for farm equipment? Different requirements will require different machines. You will almost always find that you will find things to do on your machine that are larger than your machine can handle. There is no perfect machine for all jobs. You should consider needs vs. wants in the machine you buy. As you learn, you will probably find that you will be outgrowing the first machine you get, and you will see that you want or don't want certain features or capacities. You will eventually get more stuff! :-) Much of the stuff will stay when or if the first lathe is replaced with the next one. Lots of knowlegable folk here. Helpful too. Some strongly held opinions here too. :-) Ask lots of questions.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
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Hey Trevor,
Very nice answer. Should go in the FAQ for RCM.
Thank you. Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario
Reply to
Brian Lawson
Thanks for the advice. Haven't googled it yet. The plans I was referring to came free with the purchase of an electrical box on Ebay. If this link works, you could see it at...
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...but I don't know if it will be there as there are only a few minutes left in the auction (really just a purchase now thing). I will include the text of the item below. Is this something I need or can make much cheaper if needing three-phase power?
Thanks for the help, -- Harmon
7 1/2 to 10-HP ROTARY PHASE CONVERTER PANEL US $229.99
This auction is for a new 10 HP rotary phase converter panel, which will run any standard 3-phase mill, lathe, grinder, saw, shaper, drill press, etc. up to 10 horsepower from the single phase power available in your home. It can also be used as a 7 1/2 HP panel. Just connect any new or used 10 HP 240 volt three phase motor to the converter, run standard single phase 240 volt power in, and the converter will give you a 3-phase 240 volt circuit to connect to your machinery. I use one of these panels in my garage to run a 2 HP Bridgeport mill, a 10" Logan lathe, and a 2-speed Clausing drill press... all run perfectly. You can pick up a used 3-phase idler motor for about what it would cost just for the shipping on a new one, and three simple, clearly-marked connections are all you need to hook it up. I'll even give you tips on where to find a used motor, which probably won't cost you more than $75-$100 (I paid $75 for the one I use to test my 10-HP panels, and it looks and runs like new). Other people are selling similar panels on eBay, so why should you buy one from me?
Reply to
H. Buger
Thank you very much! What a wealth of information :-!
I would like to be able to repair / modify / refurbish equipment such as one would find in a home shop. Right now, I am gathering parts to build a cheap cnc machine with woodworking tools which I find people doing at
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, but would really like someday to be able to build something like what I see an expert building at
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.
I am bidding on some Ebay lathes which do not require three-phase power right now, so I can start learning. Hopefully I won't win them all! A couple of 6x18" Craftsman-Atlas or just Atlas units and a couple of mini-lathes, one of which is the Harbor Freight variety. I live in Orange County, (Southern) California, some bids are for local stuff and some from back east.
I am concerned about whether buying used from just some pictures will get me a machine which is usable right away. I was bidding on one second operation lathe locally and went to the dealer to pick up a drill press I had won on Ebay. The thing looked great in the pictures, but it had no chuck on it, and when I stuck my finger in the headstock taper, I could feel a thick layer of rust on one side. I would not know how to fix this, so I assume if I had won that, I would be the proud owner of a very large paperweight. As it is, the drill press has more wiggle than my $30 model, but I haven't the slightest idea how to fix it!
Anyway, thank you very much for the help. It is all extremely appreciated :-D.
-- Harmon
Reply to
H. Buger
Second operation lathes brought next to nothing at a recent auction. Most of them went for about $50, and they were Rivett lathes in nice shape and could be inspected under power. Before you bid on Harbor Freight stuff, be aware of how much the new item costs on sale with free shipping. You may spend more on ebay.
Reply to
ATP
Wow! Where can I find such an auction?
The one I was bidding on went for $760...
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Thanks for the info, - Harmon
Reply to
H. Buger
Word of mouth from fellow hobbyists, net searches, also sometimes machinery dealers leave auctioneer's tags on stuff. The NY Times Sunday edition has a page advertising auctions. Auctions do require a substantial commitment of time and energy. Some geographic areas have better auctions going on than others. I try to stay within a 50 mile radius of my home.
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Reply to
ATP

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