What is the frost line for Kentucky?

[in reply to "Pedro"]
Good advice, of course, but stryped actually misquoted Pedro, who wrote: "stand my poles plumb", (poles, not holes) ie, line the poles up and make them vertical.
AIUI, about a dozen different people have told stryped to put the poles 4' deep -- to handle wind load -- but he is still talking about 2' deep -- "easier to put in the poles". It may be that stryped is planning to lay each pole on the ground by its hole and then lean over, pick it up by hand, and put it in. Obviously he needs to be educated about a better way to handle the poles. For example, line up the back of your trailer with the hole; let about 3' of pole overhang; cinch the pole to the trailer edge like a hinge; swing the pole up, maybe using an A-frame on the trailer; uncinch the pole and let it drop straight down.
Reply to
James Waldby
Loading thread data ...
Why be sorry? Just put 'em in as deep as you feel like, I'm sure it will work out OK.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
And if it doesn't work out, he'll be chasing his barn and all the contents through the countryside in the next really stiff windstorm. Of course, when that outbuilding blows across the property line into the neighbors house and demolishes it, a simple "sorry" ain't gonna cut it.
(And your homeowners insurance carrier will be looking for any convenient "out" so they don't have to pay for it. No building permit, no engineering, no inspections is a perfect excuse for them.)
Think about it... Erecting the building to meet or exceed the local building codes is the right way to do it, and whenever in doubt go a bit "overkill". If you overbuild it a bit (or a lot) in good faith, and you can prove it with all the inspections and engineering papers and a pile of construction photographs - and something bad still happens - they can't come back at you nearly as easily.
-->--
Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
Well hold on now. I think it sounds like he has his mind flat-out made up on the issue. I've come to the conclusion (after many experiences like this) that folks who have their "mind made up" about the answer to a question they've posed should be treated politely to the utmost.
I've seen over a half-dozen good comments from folks here about how his two foot answer is higly suspect, at best. Sometimes the *best* way to convince folks that their plan of action is going to result in a screw-up is to listen to their strong arguments in favor of it, and then do NOT give any substantive refutation of approach. Do NOT give them something to nit-pick at, and do NOT be a nay-sayer.
Just say, hmm, sounds like you've got the whole thing planned out just the way you want it. Hope it works out for the best. I'm sure it'll be a lovely barn.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.