Where can I get a tool for scraping?

I'm trying to scrap flat a cast aluminum piece. The small chisel that I got isn't working too well. Any suggestions?
thanks,
Robert If time is the 4th dimension, then money is the 5th dimension. We are always concerned about dollars per hour for the space we occupy. - Rod White
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Try a polishing wheel or a wire wheel. Aluminum is normally covered with aluminum oxide, the stuff from which abrasive wheels are made, so the surface is actually dulling the chisel, since you are chiseling the oxide, rather than the aluminum itself. I doubt that an oxidized piece of aluminum can be scraped into another shape effectively. And aluminum likes oxygen very much, so it oxidizes quickly in air.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

NO. I made thousands of strokes on... popcan alloy was it? Before resharpening. Amazingly I seem to be able to go for much longer on steel!
Oh, the scraper is the tang end of a small bastard file. But the tang got broken off so it's the nominal width of the file. I ground a radius with the Dremel and honed an edge with a diamond stone.
Tim
-- "I have misplaced my pants." - Homer Simpson | Electronics, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --+ Metalcasting and Games: http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The tang end of the file maybe too soft. Try using the end of the file , its much harder and will give you a much better edge.
Tim Williams wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It broke, and at a rather high force as I recall... yeah I think the broken end will work fine. ;-)
Of course, if anyone else wants to do it this way, yes I'd recommend using the nose end instead. Grind off a few inches of teeth on a fat, dead bastard, get a light radius on the end and go for it.
Tim
-- "I have misplaced my pants." - Homer Simpson | Electronics, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --+ Metalcasting and Games: http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

McMaster Carr has tubular construction hand scrapers for sale inexpensively. Carbide or HSS. I would do that.
Jim
================================================= please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ================================================
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Get yourself a worn out file, and grind the end to shape.
Al Moore
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This might work with aluminum. Apparently most modern files are case hard, so grinding the end into a scraper (was a common procedure) may no longer give good results.
Jim
================================================= please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ================================================
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Mmm. Perhaps I should have specified. All my worn-out files are even older than I am, so...
Al Moore
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Good suggestions. I think I got an old file I can use and I'll check out that source for the tools.
Robert
wrote:

If time is the 4th dimension, then money is the 5th dimension. We are always concerned about dollars per hour for the space we occupy. - Rod White
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You already have the chisel. That should be of a suitable material if you re-grind it to the right shape.
Mark Rand RTFM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a couple of tools for scraping. One is made from a worn out file about ten inches long. The file teeth were ground off at the end of the file. The end has a slight radius on it ( done free hand ) and the end is ground with about an 85 degree edge.
The other one is a piece of scrap steel that has a carbide insert silver soldered to it. I used an insert with a positive rack.
Dan

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Try a bearing scraper

- Rod White
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert:
The tool seems to be less important than how it is ground & sharpened. You're not specific as to what "small" means. The scraper I use most of the time is > 1" wide, giving more edge to use up before the next sharpening. I found that the longer tools with a bit of flex, just a bit, worked better. I made my own, large, handle or knob for my favorite scraper. And I do have my favorite. It uses the HSS inserts for the Anderson Bros. scrapers. Enco makes knock-offs that work just as well, and are far less expensive.
Properly forging a spent file is something I'd rather not spend time doing. Best of luck. Also, Michael Morgan's video on scraping will tell you more in 10 minutes than you can learn in a month of futzing around. It may not be readily available, there has been an ongoing battle with his situation, and trouble delivering things.

- Rod White
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dies Deambulo writes:

Cheap screwdriver, cut off tip to leave cylindrical end, turn down and thread to 1/4-20. Now you can attach triangular carbide inserts.
Or you can buy this for less than $10 (with insert) in the tile tools at Lowes.
Home Depot used to have a Sandvik version of this in their tile tools.
Werner also makes a cool paint scraper with a 2.5" flat carbide blade at Lowes.
I've been taking the replacement Werner blades, snapping them in pieces, and brazing them to 1x5x0.125 steel strips, and fastening those to 1/2" EMT conduit, to make a carbide tool for precision scraping. Less than $10 and works like the $100 Dapra item. This does require a tool grinder with diamond or green wheel to reform the sharp edge to blunt.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wow. Cool way to make a tool! Someone asked (well sort of) about the chisel I was using. It's a 3/4 inch wood chisel that I picked up a while back. Seems like it's just not removing any material but probably my technique. I think I'll check out the video and book cited.
Robert On Mon, 26 Apr 2004 09:34:52 -0500, Richard J Kinch

If time is the 4th dimension, then money is the 5th dimension. We are always concerned about dollars per hour for the space we occupy. - Rod White
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, I solved my particular problem. I took that chisel and made it quite a bit smaller. It was half an inch wide now it's about 3/16 inch wide. I then put a good sharp edge on it and then heat tempered it. Works very well. Thanks for all the input.
Robert
wrote:

If time is the 4th dimension, then money is the 5th dimension. We are always concerned about dollars per hour for the space we occupy. - Rod White
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.