wire markers

i have a need to mark wire with numbers in the 300s. i normally use
these:
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grainger part 3TP40 as an example.
They only go up to 149. I don't really want to buy a special printer
or hand write. Anyone know of a pre printed solution for marking wires
with higher numbers?
FWIW, I'd like to keep the same numbers as the existing machine.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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If I'm building a new panel I usually use laser printed self laminating labels. I use excel to print the sheets.
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I'm building a panel for a friend right now. He supplied heat shrink labels. I think he also uses excel to generate the numbers.
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For work on existing panels, where it's difficult to predict what numbers will be needed, I use either snap-on markers (bottom of McMaster p.1956) or hand mark self laminating labels or blank vinyl cloth labels (the type you're using).
Reply to
Ned Simmons
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or grainger part 3TP40 as an example.
I normally use the number wire markers that come in a little carrier of 10 rolls of 0-9 tape. Since you apply each individual number wrap you can do any number you want. I believe they are a Brady product, possibly other brands have the same thing as well.
Reply to
Pete C.
Print numbers on paper with laser printer (or even ink jet) and use clear heat shrink to attach strips to wire.
Reply to
clare
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or grainger part 3TP40 as an example.
Pete, as far as I can tell you can't buy just one digit. Every wire is going to have a "3" so I'd run one digit pretty hard.
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Ned, how well do these hold up to oil? The inside of a CNC machine ends up with a coat over time. Gives the dirt something to stick to. I've wiped down as much as I can but I'm cutting existing wires and hooking up to Opto22 and Galil boards.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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>> or grainger part 3TP40 as an example.
Yes, you can. Refill digit rolls are available from any of the industrial suppliers.
Reply to
Pete C.
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>> or grainger part 3TP40 as an example.
Grainger catalog page 419, 3M brand refill digit tape rolls $2.52 ea.
Reply to
Pete C.
Anyone with a spreadsheet and laser printer can mass-produce printed numbers, and after you snip the bits apart with scissors, a length of clear tape can hold each label to its assigned wire. There is also a kind of clear heatshrink tubing available.
I'd expect Avery to have a complete wire-label solution, actually. Haven't seen it yet, though.
Reply to
whit3rd
Just an addendum to this conversation -
All the solutions mentioned thus far have the label wrapped around the wire. This does not meet Bellcore standards (don't ask me to look up the exact one) because the label is not readable from any direction when the cable is connected. You must use a label that leaves a flag sticking out from the wire. Brady makes them, for sure (and I'm not looking that up, either).
A few years back, I got to supervise a couple of electricians while they relabeled a whole AT&T DSLAM installation because it failed for this.
Just sayin'
Reply to
rangerssuck
I'd be interested to know more about that. My little CNC mill has the little clip on numbered plastic collars to label the wires, typically 2 next to each other at each wire end. Some weren't visible due to rotation but were easily rotated so they could be read. Not much point them facing the back of the control box as you couldn't get your head in there and would have needed a mirror to read them if the case. How big is the flag as in my case some wires are close so could that prevent flag rotation or prevent moved flags from being rotated into view. The control box for my mill is currently 24" x 24" x 12" deep so maybe your requirements are for different types of installations?.
Reply to
David Billington
The number tape I suggested is also readable from any angle since the number repeats continuously on the tape.
Reply to
Pete C.
Google Brady. They make a 100 buck thermal printer that works well. It is being phased out so the 130 dollar one may be all you find. I've use the Brady ID Pro for years.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
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>> or grainger part 3TP40 as an example.
Thanks Pete, you sold me. I just placed an order.
I had a really good day on the mill project. Put in ten hours no interruptions. Got the wire way to the power supply cabinet done, got Estop buttons working with a drop out for no third phase, Got a whole bunch of unused cables removed, Pulled USB and monitor power cables into the operator panel, figured how I'm going to mount the moniter mouse and keyboard and designed the computer swing out support. I just got the DC power cabinet all finish wired and debugged yesterday.
Tonight, I need to record notes on wires and cables into the computer spreadsheet. Tomorrow, I'll take all the servos apart and figure how to mount encoders. Then get them ordered.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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>> >> or grainger part 3TP40 as an example.
Sounds like a fun day. Let me know if you need any help when you get to the ATC.
Reply to
Pete C.
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>> >> or grainger part 3TP40 as an example.
I'll need a ton 'o help here. I don't plan to touch this till late next year at the soonest. I've got a poor heating system in the barn shop (torpedo heater) so I'm only working on the machine three or four more weeks this year. I hope to have hot chips on the floor before winter shutdown.
karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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>> >> >> or grainger part 3TP40 as an example.
Yea, my shop is starting to get chilly. Fortunately I have a new (used) HVAC system for it leftover from replacing my house system with a new heat pump earlier this year. I just need to get the air handler up into the shop attic, some ducts connected and a little wiring done and I'll have real heat in the shop this winter. In the spring I'll get the A/C side if things connected and charged for summer.
Reply to
Pete C.

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