Anyone messed about making plastic castings?

I'm wondering about the feasability of making a plastic antenna part.
Just wondering if anyone knows anything about making plastic castings.
Reply to
Richard
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Richard,
Could possibly cast it using a resin / catylist system but probably best done with an injection system. Either way the hard bit is making the mould cavity.
I have a bench top injection one that I've sucessfully made replacement washing machine push buttons that were otherwise obsolete /
unobtainable but the vandals don't care about that and love to put a cigarette lighter to them in my shops !
Andrew Mawson
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
What frequency are you working at? I've found that pretty much anything you can cast will be absorbtive at VHF and above. You may be better off machining from nylon, acrylic or PTFE stock.
Chris
Reply to
Chris Eilbeck
Just had two moulds made for old-fashioned switchboard fuseholders, product is made from a casting resin. Moulds are also resin...
Peter
Reply to
Peter A Forbes
If your interested in making small plastic components then you might like to have a look at 'Polymorph' which is available from Maplins (Shops or on-line). It is a plastic (supplied as granules) that becomes soft when put in hot water above about 60C IIRC and can be moulded at that temperature. When it cools it becomes quite tough and looks rather like Nylon. If its not right just boil the kettle again and remelt it! Certainly worth buying a tub for experimenting with.
Don
Reply to
Don Valentine
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Details here for casting, might be of interest. They used to do a good series of How To booklets.
Lionel
Reply to
Lionel
There was an article back in the summer in MEW (not that I'd own up to reading that) on DIY plastic injection molding small items - I can send you a scan if your interested.
Steve
---------------------------------------------------------- Steve Randall G8KHW snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com UKRA #1072 Level 2
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Reply to
steve randall
Depends on resin grade and loading. Properly loaded casting resins have negligible losses at 60 MHz and scarcely get warm in the microwave.
Reply to
Tim Christian

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