Bloody Weather!

I dropped a lathe (Denford Viceroy) in the canal a few years ago. I was selling it to the guy at the neighbouring boatyard. The trailer 'became unhitched' just as I was setting off to deliver it. After 3 days underwater (it was quite a game salvaging lathe & trailer from 6' of water with no lifting gear!), I dried it all out, changed the oils, put the motor by the stove in the kitchen for a few days. He still bought it for the agreed price, knowing what had happened, & sold it earlier this year for more than he paid me for it.

Cheers Tim Dutton Dry-Dock Traditional & Modern canal craft repairs Vintage diesel engine service

Reply to
Tim Leech
Loading thread data ...

Peter - Terrible luck with the flood. I've always been extremely glad to live at the very top of a hill, but after the clean-up contracts from the Carlisle floods I can fully understand and sympathise (?sp) with what you are feeling. Mother nature is a wonderful thing when in a good mood, but...

Austin - Sounds like we've got the same trouble up here too! The roof on our store is corrugated asbestos/cement fibre/whatever sheets with bloody great CI roof lights set in. Sadly one of the runs of Purlins has gone rotten and is collapsing, taking 2 of the lights with it. Managed to score a huge heap of cheap tin sheets off a farmer, so it'll be cheap enough to do but still an absolute pig of a job! Cheers and good luck, Scruff.

Reply to
scruffybugger

Peter, the image of you sitting up all night with a rubber squeegy thing, wellington boots, sou'wester and a mac turning back the tide like King Canute is disturbing my sleep. Have you successfully fought off the elements and cleaned up yet? I would sleep easier if I could imagine your machines sitting on a clean, dry floor all shiny and pristine. Joking apart, hope the cleanup is going well and mother nature has given you a bit of a break this time. Good luck.

Best regards

Keith

Reply to
jontom_1uk

Keith, your description made me smile :)

Well the promised 2nd round deluge never materialised that night, just some light rain really and not even enough to rinse the inch of mud off the patio at the back.

I've actually been back in the workshop and on the mill since so it's not as bad as it could be. The big clean-up is going to be a major inconvenience though as everything really has to be moved out to get to it all, and obviously protected from the elements whilst this happens.

It will give me a chance to re-screed and re-paint the floor to get some lumps out, and I've been promising to build a better bench (with above ground storage!) so it will probably spur me on to do this.

Peter

Reply to
Peter Neill

there now,

tonight:(

happens.

(with

Is there anywhere that you could put in a dwarf wall round the workshop with perhaps a loose piece to give ground level entry / exit for heavy stuff? When heavy rain is forcast bung in the bung !

AWEM

Reply to
Andrew Mawson

Excuse me, not being one to be politically correct but it's not a dwarf wall, it's a vertically challenged wall.

.

-- Regards,

John Stevenson Nottingham, England.

Visit the new Model Engineering adverts page at:-

formatting link

Reply to
John Stevenson

Unfortunately my workshop is in the garage attached to the house, so probably not a viable proposition long-term.

However, that idea of yours has given me a cunning plan.

If I build a dwarf wall along the edge of my boundary with my neighbours (where *all* the water comes from) then this may well keep the water completely away from my property and completely in his, but at twice the previous level it rose to .

Seeing as we have already fallen out about his yappy little dog and their plans to build a huge extension (we heard from the planning dept, not them...) I would not only have no compunction about this would actually take great delight from it !

Peter

Reply to
Peter Neill

I hear that yappy little dogs are great for reinforcing foundations ;-)

Regards, Tony

Reply to
Tony Jeffree

Excuse me, not being one to be politically correct but it's not a dwarf wall, it's a vertically challenged wall.

.

-- Regards,

John Stevenson Nottingham, England.

Does that make the politically correct wall a "short Arse"???

Steve Larne

-- Steve Larne

----------------------------------------------------------------------- Steve Larner's Profile:

formatting link
this thread:
formatting link

Reply to
Steve Larner

Peter, we've just been through a similar fallout when next door thought they would pay for the kids education by building another house in their garden. First we found out was from the planning office. Luckily my sons (then) girlfriend's father is a planning officer so he produced one of those "according to para x line y of zzz regulations type letters for a bottle of malt Irish and the application was rejected. More good news when they got pi****d off and sold the house. If it is a large extension will that not make the flooding even worse? might be worth getting a local planning officer out to express your concerns.

A local house that has a river on it's boundary was always flooding until they built a small wall about 2-3' high. Although the garden is often below the water level their garden and house now stay dry. They backed it up with an earth bank and now it's landscaped it just looks as if the garden rises towards a very small less than a foot boundary wall. Effective if you have the room. Earth banks are also good for swallowing up yappy little dogs.

Hope you can sort it out, best regards

Keith

Reply to
jontom_1uk

Make sure it has deep foundations (with or without yappy dogs) - heck of a pressure all that water. I'd be tempted to dig a good deep trench, shutter up to wall top height, and pour it in solid concrete with weldmesh in it. Then perhaps brick skin the face that you see.

AWEM

Reply to
Andrew Mawson

Depending, of course, on just how evil and/or devious you wish to be...

One of the best non lethal ways of dealing with neighbors dogs that I have come across yet, is to wait for a good rain (I know, never gonna happen, right :-) ), and dice up a handful of Oxo cubes (bullion cubes).

Broadcast these over the fence and let the rain work them into the lawn. The dog or dogs will dig nearly to China to try to find the source of the wonderful scent.

Only works on folk that are proud of their lawns, though.

Cheers Trevor Jones

Reply to
Trevor Jones

On or around Fri, 27 Oct 2006 18:30:04 GMT, Trevor Jones enlightened us thusly:

Sorry, this just has to be crossed into ye shedde.

Reply to
Austin Shackles

Filed away in my book of deviousness.

Reply to
malc

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.