Compressor woes

I've recently taken delivery of a second-hand (new to me) Ingersoll Rand "Euro 10" compressor. A vertical tank with an electric motor driving a
"V" pump.
It was delivered during the big freeze and when I first turned it on, it wouldn't run. I assumed the oil in the sump was too cold. Eventually, after a lot of coaxing it ran and pressurised.
Since then its moved to the workshop (still unheated) where I have the same problem, it turns over slowly, not enough to run properly and likely to trip its thermal fuse or blow the plug top fuse!
A couple of days ago, whilst setting up my new lathe, I left a fan heater pointing at the base of the pump for about 1.5 hours and it started without a problem.
So, the oil in the pump sump is too sticky when cold. Any ideas of what oil I should use - is there a special compressor oil, or could I use a thinner car oil?
Happy New Year to you all and may all your swarf production be worthwhile!
Cheers
Peter
--
1989 Defender 90
1990 Defender 110 County (Reggie the Veggie)
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On 10-12-28 12:48 PM, puffernutter wrote:

A car oil is not recommended. In a non filtered application, such as a smaller compressor, a non detergent oil should be used. A car oil would carry all the little wear particles with it, in suspension.
A non detergent oil lets the crud drop out and fall to the sump of the compressor when the unit is at rest.
Try using a 30 weight compressor oil first. if your problem still persists, try a twenty weight. It's best to change it when the unit is warmed up. Try tilting the unit towards the drain and let it drip for a long time.
Filtered supply: detergent car oil Non-filtered supply: NON detergent oil
mike
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