Keeping this group going?

OK, is it true that when you only have a single phase motor, that when turning at high speeds that there is a just barely
perceptible modulation of the workpiece as it turns, caused by the 50 Hz excitation?
I was told this some years ago, but being somewhat of a cautious person, I've never run the lathe at its top speed.
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"gareth" wrote in message

All motors including 3 phase ones, will exhibit that to an extent. 3 phase obviously reduces the problem, but so does the inertia of pulleys, spindles, lathe chucks etc acting as a flywheel to average out the motion.
Andrew
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I didn't do any heavy machine stuff at Uni (all light current electronics) but I thought that the idea of 3-phase was constant power delivery?
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"gareth" wrote in message

But nothing is perfect - the motor construction and wire winding won't be absolutely symmetrical.
Andrew
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On Fri, 14 Nov 2014 15:55:39 -0000, "Andrew Mawson"

With a single phase motor that had no run capacitor or shaded pole, the torque would drop to zero 100 times per second. With a run capacitor or a shaded pole, the fluctuation is a lot less, but still substantial.
With a three phase motor the deviation is only a few percent.
--

Mark Rand
RTFM

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