Myford motor strip.

Hi, can anyone help me? I dropped a small washer inside the Crompton
Parkinson 1ph motor on my Myford ML7. I've had a good look around, but I
think I should take the endplate off (opposite end to the pully) to check it
out. Is it as easy as it looks? just undo the endplate through bolts? is
there anything to watch out for, like brushes flying out??
Any help would be appreciated.
Brad
Reply to
DAVE
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Why bother stripping it, unless the washer is precious in some way? The Myford motor sits horizontally mounted so the washer will just in the end well and do no harm. The only slight chance of it causing a problem would be if the motor was vertically mounted and the washer was at the top end, but even then I doubt much would happen as the rotor clearances are so fine.
Assuming the washer is ferrous, then you could use one of those tiny but powerful neodymium magnets and some coat hanger wire to fish it out. Works a treat when you've dropped a bolt into a crankcase ;-)
-Neil F.
Reply to
neil f
Depends where it fell. I would never be happy with lumps of loose metal inside a motor, where vibration could have it thrown up to do damage, cut through windings or short motor live to ground etc. It only takes minutes to remove the end cover, so why take chances ?.
Silly question really :-)...
Chris
Reply to
ChrisQuayle
Yes, I think I would feel much better if I strip the motor, there is a small chance the washer could have fallen out through one of the ventilation slots, but to be 100% sure a strip would be best. Would there be anything to look out for? or is really straight forward to pull the end plate off? I dread something flying out at me which could be difficult to get back in again. Another thought has occured to me about the slots on the motor....would they need a guard over them when using coolant near the chuck ?....a little bit of perspex do ?....or would it????
Reply to
DAVE
Am not familiar with the Myford motors, but most either have studs from end to end and nuts to hold the covers on, or bolts on the covers into the centre casting.. Either way, it's usually not a problem to get apart. At least one of the bearings may be located at both sides with a plate screwed to the end cover, with the other end bearing spring preloaded or just floating. If you look through the ventilation holes, you should be able to see which end has the retained bearing, then undo bolts and tap or gently prise off the end cover complete with rotor and opposite end bearing, which is usually just a mild interference fit in the end cover.
If the bearings don't have dust covers, it's also an opportunity to inspect the windings and clean / repack the bearings with grease, which may not have been done since the motor was made.
What's the saying - do the job right once, or do it twice :-)...
Chris
Reply to
ChrisQuayle
I had a problem with stuff getting through those slots many years ago. My motor has large washer or ring on the end held by screws. Took the bottom half of a 5 litre (or was it 4?) plastic bottle of square cross section. Slipped over the motor and attached by clamping with the ring. Air gets out - nothing gets in. Been like that for many years now.
Henry
Reply to
Dragon
Many thanks to all who contributed to my little problem with the Myford motor.....I eventually plucked up the courage to strip the motor in search of the elusive washer. Strip down was hell of a lot easier than I thought....no washer found....so I'm satisfied now that all is well........however, I've tried to wire the motor via flexible conduit....hole ialready in motor casing for the connector, great....BUT...when I wired it I noticed that the conduit came out directly opposite the starter capacitor........when fitting it to the lathe, the capacitor is now in the way (at the top).....if turn slightly to get it in, the conduit connector now gets in the way of the motor mounting bracket...grrrr!.....plus the conduit comes almost upto the lathe bed (BAD).......only way I can see of wiring it now is to use 4 core + earth cable from the motor.....that would physically work, but I wanted all cables to go into flexible conduit...plus the oil ways are in the wrong place (I tried turning the motor end plate round but internal cables prevent this).....hope this lot was of interest ...and I obviously have a lot to learn.
Reply to
DAVE
No room to fit an elbow?
Peter
Reply to
Peter Neill
Brilliant idea using an elbow, if it's cut a little short and 'cemented' into place, I can still convert to flexible conduit straight after the elbow !!! Many thanks for that ! Cheers Peter. Soon have the lathe up and running now (once I've levelled it and set it up properly). Dave
Reply to
DAVE

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