OT but someone here might know

Years ago, there was a prototype electrical generator shown on TV - possibly Tomorrow's World etc.
It was a low ramp on which one wheel of a vehicle was driven and parked.
In the ramp was a pair of rollers driving a generator. The other vehicle wheels were chocked. With the car in gear and at tickover speeds a useful amount of power was generated. I seem to recall the demonstration was a farmer going out to repair a gateway and being able to run an electric drill to assist the repair.
Does anyone know if this was ever taken to a commercial product and have any references to it?
I have an application where something like this would be a possible solution.
Thanks in Advance
Bob
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Bob Minchin wrote:

I dunno, but your average car alternator puts out 60 A at 12 V (700W, 1 HP), at a reasonable idling speed. More than enough to power a drill.
If you need 230V a suitable 12V-130V converter is only about 65, eg
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Sealey-700W-Power-Inverter-12V-DC-230V-PI700_W0QQitemZ300315938027QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUK_Home_Garden_PowerTools_SM?hash=item45ec398ceb&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14
or at half that power with a 600 W maximun peak power (suitable for most drills) for 35 or so.
-- Peter Fairbrother
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There used to be an Australian company selling a car alternator that let you weld direct from it.You could also pull about 220v for power tools.
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Depending on what you want to run an AC compressor can be used to run most air tools in the back of beyond. Can be fitted to the engine and turned on with the std magnetic clutch when required.
Dave
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small.planes wrote:

Thanks for the replies so far. The important part of my requirement is the vehicle is unmodified and the drive is taken from a driven wheel. Bob
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Won't you need some sort of control loop driving the throttle input by monitoring the generator output?
Chris
--
Chris Eilbeck

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Chris Eilbeck wrote:

Only for the perfectionists. Universal motors are not worried by differing frequencies. I want it to turn a pump anyway. No electricity in the way.
Bob
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Probably dearer than a portable generator?
Henry
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Dragon wrote:

Quite likely true but I want the mechanical parts to drive a pump and trying to take a short-cut rather than making it from scratch.
Bob
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I've a feeling such things are used for starting hot-rods or racing bikes or possibly karts. I'm sure I've seen something of the ilk at a racing track, but I have to confess I really can't remember where or when. Thinking about it they would probably be rather heavy for yor application, but maybe worth a snoop about.
Richard
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wrote:

Dunno, but I saw one on "Blue Peter", years ago, - knackered old truck, jacked up as you describe, wheel fitted, but no tyre, flat belt, guess the rest. Somewhere in Africa.
Also on that program, a revisit to see what had happened to the Blue Peter lorries sent over a decade before. No local Halfords, so batteries completely knackered. Solution was a car wheel welded outboard onto the fan pulley with outrigger bearing, length of rope, a dozen natives, one good pull, big cloud of black smoke...
Regards,
David P.
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You would probably have to use a car without ABS otherwise it will try to brake what it thinks is a spinning wheel, doubt it would do the diff a lot of good either
Jason
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On Tue, 18 Aug 2009 12:16:40 -0500, jasonballamy

That'd be traction control, which can be turned off in decent cars.
Mark Rand RTFM
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jasonballamy wrote:

Good point. Some cars won't appreciate the continuous use of the differential as the diff gears don't have sufficient lubrication to cope with continuous use, they aren't designed for it . Low speed, low load, you might get away with it, but from some experience this can be a major failure in the making. The diff may not fail at that use but what may later happen is the diff cross pin comes out as the locking pin fails due to fretting from partial seizure of the planet gear to cross pin.
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David Billington wrote:

My application is for tickover speed, for a few 10s of minutes. Vehicles are likely to be citroen 2CV or similar. ABS pah!!
Bob
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ABS does not apply brakes, it releases them. Perhaps you mean traction control?
Cliff Coggin.
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