Straightening a 2" bar

I have a 2" diameter bar of steel 36" long with a 1" 'droop' in the
middle. This is one of the two bars that the fork lift forks slide on
on the front bucket of a JCB so it is likely to be a bit stronger /
tougher than mild steel. Is it feasable to straighten it under a
hydraulic press, or should I fork out (sorry!) the £70 plus vat that
JCB want for a new one.
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
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Will straighten easily with a hydraulic press and vee blocks(steel ones). Don`t know about the pin for the forks but the 3C 1.3/4" bucket pins are mild steel according to a spec a customer got from JCB in order for us to make pins that they could not supply quickly. Mark.
Reply to
mark
Will straighten easily with a hydraulic press and vee blocks(steel ones). Don`t know about the pin for the forks but the 3C 1.3/4" bucket pins are mild steel according to a spec a customer got from JCB in order for us to make pins that they could not supply quickly. Mark.
Interesting Mark. Now all I need is someone local with a darn great press as this is a meaty bar! Incidentally, 3C & 3CX use the same buckets & pins and are available from numerous places at £12 a pop. There are three lengths, (9 & 12" buckets have shorter pins and everything above that uses the same ones).
SO.... anyone in East Sussex or Kent / Sussex borders got a darm great hydraulic press ??????
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
Errrm, you've got a chuffin great JCB!! What else do you need?
Chris
Reply to
Chris Eilbeck
slide
order
great
It's bad enough picking up a pallet when it it TOTALLY obscured by the 6 in 1 bucket (particularly at the moment with one drooping fork), nevermind prescision thumping 2" bars, but I like your thinking ! I suppose I could stamp on it with one of the rear stabiliser legs.
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
If you've got oxy gear and a decent bench vice, you could always heat it & do it by hand. Assuming it's not heat-treated, of course.
Tim
Reply to
Tim Leech
You could always weld along the back of the bend with a nice big spread and when it`s cool,grind it off.Used to straighten eight inch shafts that way. We do the 14" bucket pin for a bit less than =A312 if you buy enough of them. Mark.
Reply to
mark
It might be worth trying a firm that straightens motorcycle fork legs, although they are tubular they are around the same diameter.
The link below will take you a company in Kent - I have no knowledge of them apart from knowing they straiten fork legs.
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Godd luck.
John
Reply to
jlh45
WW2 story, told to me by my father:
A chap was being examined for certification as an aircraft armourer. One question was "What would you do with this", presenting him with a machine gun barrel which had bowed from overheating.
Chap replies " Straighten it". Examiner says "How?", and the chap demonstrates, He heats up the barrel with a blowtorch, puts is over a couple of logs, and straightens it with a sledgehammer.
Turns out that the chap had been working for Vickers, doing exactly that job, for several years.
The examiner failed him, as the correct answer was "Return it to Vickers for straightening".
ymmv
-- Peter Fairbrother
Reply to
Peter Fairbrother
If it's one of the more modern machines on which the control is more precise, you might manage it. I think you be lucky to get the degree of control required using an older machine, though. They can be beasts.
Best wishes,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Why not just get a bit of 2" steel 36" long from the local stockist ?
.
Reply to
John Stevenson
Because it`s too easy and we wouldn`t have anything to read at tea break. Mark.
Reply to
mark
That is the frustration John. ALL my machine tools are in storage, don't even have a vice (well not that sort!!) The bar needs two grooves for retaining clips, one each end - a nice simple turning job if the lathe wasn't under tarps in someone elses barn!
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
Why not borrow the use of a lathe from someone local on the NG? Some 2 years ago Charles Ping was kind enough to let me use his Kerry to mod some Acme stock to make a new leadscrew for the Myford. I'm sure many here would be prepared to help Andrew.
Peter
Reply to
Peter Neill
Andrew
I've got some spare 2" bar that would do the job - it came from Peter Neill's factory closure the other year. I could slice a 3 ft length and put the grooves in. The only problem is that I'm in Suffolk and your somewhere near the Channel. Might be easier to pay a shop in Hastings to straighten the one you've got.
Charles
Reply to
Charles Ping
Peter
Thanks Charles, but news flash from 5 mins ago - the chap who's putting up my barn extension steel work and fibre cement roof wants to use the JCB to unload the roofing sheets from his lorry. When I told him about the fork droop he immediately responded by offering to straighten the bar on his 50 ton press. Now I've measured it it's 'only' 1.75 inches
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
In article , "Andrew Maws>
I use an ancient Bonser 90D forklift for straightening 4" box. Just trap it between the mast and chassis with a bit of rebar trapped where force is to be applied.
Regards,
David P.
Reply to
David Powell

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