Tolerance/fit question

I am turning a ballscrew end down, to fit a 6mm dia bearing. The bearing will be ABEC7, which has a hole tolerance of 0 to -4 microns.
So far, so good. But how big should I make the shaft?
It is 6.000 mm now (yes, to +/-1 micron :o), but normally I'd turn it down a bit more; I don't want to have to heat the bearing to get it on/off, a sort of medium interference fit will do.
I have been googling, and there are tables of tolerances, and pages with recommended fits, but I haven't seen one page which actually recommends an actual size or even what a normal type of fit is in terms of tolerances - maybe my google-fu, or perhaps my engineering-fu, or both, is weak today.
Thanks,
Peter Fairbrother
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wrote:

You don't want to reduce it below 6.000mm. Doing so brings the risk of a slightly sloppy fit. With the bearing tolerance and the measured shaft size,
press on at that sort of fit, but will be a hand (clean handkerchief for
that temperature.
regards
Mark Rand
--
RTFM

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On 21/10/17 22:00, Mark Rand wrote:



OK, I'll go with that for now, just round off the end edge and cut the slot for the circlip. Thanks.
I was a bit worried, it took me hours to get the ballscrew chucked with sufficiently concentricity and [parallelness of the axes of rotation and ballscrew, whatever that's called], and I didn't want to take it out of the lathe and disturb the setup.
On reflection that worry was a bit pointless, as I am using carbide paper for the final finishing-to-size, and I could just rechuck it any-old-how and hold the paper in my fingers ..
ah well, thanks anyway.
-- Peter Fairbrother

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