Is it possible to compare and combine differences from one config.pro to another?

Greetings:
My company has one config.pro for all personel. I customize, add some
personalize mapkeys and parameters for the view display etc without
modifying any existing company standard settings, save it as a second
config.pro. Times to times the company updates its config.pro. In
other to stay in pace with everyone else, I would like to update my
personalize config.pro to match the company without losing all my
settings, mapkey etc. Is it possible to compare the company config.pro
and combine the differences into my personalize config.pro?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Reply to
njchen24
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in unix you can use the diff command to get the differences between the two, in windows you'll have to find some sort of similiar utility. Then redirect the output into a file and add it to the end of your personal config. Whether you do this manually, or create a script/batch file is up to you.
BUT it may be easier to create a maykey to load a 'personal.pro' config file that has only your personal mapkeys/parameters and use that on startup.
Reply to
Stu
You could use the config.sup as the company defaults and then hav your own personal config.pro file in your working directory. Th config.sup file wins over all other config.pro files thought, that' the only draw back
Hope this helps, Glenn |B
Reply to
GWDavis28
I'm not sure of the rationale behind this. If you are simply "matching" the company's settings, it is completely unnecessary (if the company is loading its config.pro each time you start Pro; of course, maybe the sysadmin is just 'giving' you a new config file instead of going to the trouble to set up Pro to load it on startup which would be better and more effective.) Something you could try though to get the combined, up to date config.pro: LOAD BOTH ~ the company one first and yours second. Yours will install your personalized settings but retain in memory any settings that are not overwritten by yours, including all the new stuff. Do 'Apply' and then save this to a file. I think this file ought to contain all the new settings, default settings, company settings and your personalized settings. It's worth a try, anyway.
Using a compare utility is pretty effective. I was using Beyond Compare, a programmer's file compare utility recently, to investigate what changed in configuration to make assembly start in 'Move' instead of 'Place'. They do allow taking the 'difference' and adding it to your file.
Reply to
David Janes
Shouldn't be necessary if you're setup correctly.
If you're on UNIX you'll want to sym link the config.pro (and config.sup/menu_def.pro/etc.etc.) in your $loadpoint/text directory to the company copy on the server.
Then just make a personal config.pro in your home directory with just the settings you're changing/adding/mapkeys/etc.
Pro/E loads 3 levels of configs in this order: 1.the standard ones in your $loadpoint/text directory, 2.your personal ones in your home directory, 3. and project/task specific ones in your startup/working directory. Each config loads on top of the previous one, changing/adding settings. Except for the config.sup, this is where you put any settings that you don't want anyone to change, ie. the most important settings, settings in the config.sup cannot be changed or overwritten by any other config files.
Reply to
Anonymous
CSDIFF is a windows shareware utility that's great for the task. It does the "UNIX diff thing" for PC users.
formatting link

Reply to
md1
I did not read this whole post so it might be answered I did see some shit about unix or other software, Noobs.Just open the config.pro with notepad or wordpad print it. Then open the other config.pro with notepad or wordpad print it. Once you print the both read them and find the differences. I hope that more then just me came up with this idea
Reply to
shaun

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