Anyone using this microcontroller?

Is anyone here using the Atmel AVRmega series controllers, and how popular are they? They can be found here:
http://www.atmel.com/dyn/products/param_table.asp?family_id `7&OrderBy=part_no&Direction=ASC
Looks like these chips feature massive amounts of Flash ROM, EEPROM, and SRAM memory. A huge amount of I/O pins (dependong on model), 8 and 16 bit timers, analog comparitors, A/D converters, two wire serial interface, SPI, multiple UARTS, and other features.
Seems that the software development environments are free too. Those can be found here as a download:
http://www.atmel.com/dyn/products/tools_card.asp?tool_id '25
Looks pretty interesting, and depending on what you get, the chips can be had from between $5 and $15 at most parts retailers like Digi-Key.
So, what do you guys think?
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Daniel Rudy

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On Tue, 06 Jul 2004 07:29:40 GMT, Daniel Rudy
wrote:

Yeah, they're great. I'm programming up a Mega32 right now as I type.
The in system serial programming feature is great, their architectures are powerful.
The GCC compiler is good because it also supports C++ programming. That means I can do object-oriented software development on my little microcontroller.
I love them.
Cheers, Ed L
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They're great. Grab the STK500 board (and maybe a 501/2 too), and you're good to go. Studio 4 GUI / Assembler is free. I'm looking for a few more beta testers for the StatiC compiler (dual-methodology), so if you're interested, give me a shout.
Thanks, -Pete.
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And somewhere around the time of 07/06/2004 06:50, the world stopped and listened as Pete Gray contributed the following to humanity:

I called Digi-Key and they had the STK500 for $79.00. I ordered it. I'll be getting it Friday. Thanks for the suggestion.
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Daniel Rudy

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On Tue, Jul 06, 2004 at 07:29:40AM +0000, Daniel Rudy wrote:

http://www.atmel.com/dyn/products/param_table.asp?family_id `7&OrderBy=part_no&Direction=ASC
Yep. Check out the boards I make that use the ATmega128:
http://www.bdmicro.com/
The mega128 is currently the largest ATmega chip, but Atmel has been promising an ATmega256 for over a year now.
I mostly use open source programming tools with these - gnu gcc c compiler, gdb debugger, avrdude programmer (I am the author of avrdude).
Some of the things here might be a bit dated, but for a synopsis of the tools available, see:
http://www.openavr.org /
For lots of AVR related information, tools, products, etc, see:
http://www.avrfreaks.net /

I love the ATmega8 - hits the sweet spot for a single-chip solution w/regard to amount of flash (8K), ram (1K), speed (16 MIPS), and peripherals (UART, I2C, SPI, A/DC, hardware PWMs, timers, etc, etc). And at around $3.00 from Digikey for an easy to use 28-pin DIP, it cannot be beat.
I _always_ have some of these in my parts box. :-)
-Brian
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Brian Dean
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Daniel Rudy wrote:

http://www.atmel.com/dyn/products/param_table.asp?family_id `7&OrderBy=part_no&Direction=ASC
They're my micros of choice. The mega32 is usually more than enough for most of my applications. I use the Procyon AVRlib for C encapsulations of the most common features, AVRGCC for C code compilation (the WinAVR distro specifically), and the SP12 programmer for in circuit programming. All are free and open source. Atmel's IDE is pretty nice, but ironically, once I found these other tools, I've rarely used it. Granted, it's probably the way to go if you want to use simulation or an out-of-circuit programmer.
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"Daniel Rudy"
wrote in message

http://www.atmel.com/dyn/products/param_table.asp?family_id `7&OrderBy=part_no&Direction=ASC
Yup, use some here.
www.avrfreaks.com
Good robotics board www.bdmicro.com
avr butterfly is a small "starter" kit from atmel
stk500 is worth getting if your going to use avr's for a while
Cheap boards http://www.futurlec.com
http://www.futurlec.com/ATDevBoard.shtml http://www.futurlec.com/AT8535DevBoard.shtml http://www.futurlec.com/ATMegaDevBoard.shtml http://www.futurlec.com/ATMegaControlBoard.shtml don't forget the programmer as well http://www.futurlec.com/ATMegaTraining.shtml http://www.futurlec.com/TrainingBoardAccessories.shtml
free Programming options
assembly - use avr studio from atmel
c - winavr gcc port http://www.avrfreaks.net/AVRGCC /
bascom avr demo - compiled basic http://www.mcselec.com/bascom-avr.htm http://www.mcselec.com/download_avr.htm
few other links http://instruct1.cit.cornell.edu/courses/ee476 / http://instruct1.cit.cornell.edu/courses/ee476/FinalProjects/ big list of projects
http://www.edtp.com/ avr + ethernet
http://www.ipass.net/hammill/newavr.htm
But if you think thats a massive amount of flash take a look at these http://semiconductors.philips.com/catalog/282/45988/45993/45994/index.html#45994
lpc2106 128kB flash 64kB ram http://semiconductors.philips.com/pip/LPC2106.html
lpc2129 256kB flash 16kB ram http://semiconductors.philips.com/pip/LPC2129.html
smt only
Alex Gibson
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