Crystal answer.

Jim,
I think your group is doing a fantastic job on your project. I used a crystal "can" oscillator module to clock 8 PICs on
a 4-channel PID motor control project and it was perfect. If you need a 10 MHz can oscillator for your project, please send me a note and I'll pop one in the mail. I think it will be better than using a crystal on two PICs even though I believe you would be able to get that working. (If anyone wishes to disagree, please continue to do so on the OTHER thread) Just drop me a note with your shipping address if you need one right away. My project is described here: (A little bit) http://bobodyne.com/web-docs/robots/Trippy/Board/index.html (Jeff's website has hit its bandwidth limits, so I won't add a link to the schematic etc. I used Eagle also. It's great.) -Alan
--
- Alan Kilian <kilian(at)bobodyne.com>

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One note on using these.
Some are TTL output, some are CMOS output. Check the min/max output voltage on the osc spec, and rise/fall times, against the pic's data sheet for osc input.
If you got a TTL osc in a circuit that requires CMOS levels, it might work mostly, which would be a nightmare scenario. Far better that it would fail totally, but it probably wouldn't, till demo day.
For real fun, look up "Vittoz" oscillators, which are becoming more popular due to their low power focus. If your chip can do this (Atmel AVRs can) and you select it accidentally, you'll probably be in a marginal amplitude situation. Another reason to do those negative resistance tests.
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