Electronics Training / Education question

I'm a software guy in need of some electronics education. CIE (Cleveland Institute of Electronics) offer this course -
http://www.cie-wc.edu/Electronics-Technology.asp
- 'Electronics Technology with Laboratory'.
Accredited Diploma, self-paced, distance learning, includes all textbooks, lab equipment, tools and instructor support, for $1427. More importantly, the course seems to cover a large range of useful topics. It also includes a study guide for the CET (Certified Electronics Technician) exam.
It seems to be pretty good value for money, and the self paced distance learning thing works for me. Is anyone familiar with CIE, or this course in particular?
Thanks, -Pete.
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Pete Gray wrote:

I don't have any direct experience, but CIE has been around since before WWII. They are one of the creators of the distance learning system. I had a friend who went through their program in the 70s and found it helpful. I realize a lot of things can change in 30-odd years... <g>
If there are any serious complaints, the Cleveland-area BBB may have a note of it.
-- Gordon
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wrote:

Another option, if you're willing to do self-study and locate your own test equipment, is "The Art of Electronics" and the companion student manual. http://www.artofelectronics.com/ has info, links, and ISBNs. Considerably cheaper. No instructor support, just usenet ;-) Even if you do go with CIE, this is a good book to read and study.
--
Rich Webb Norfolk, VA

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I got my electronics education at a public school technical school. I am now picking up some more engineering schooling at a technical 2-year college. Both were considerably cheaper than a regular college, and in many ways better than what a regular college can offer. I would recommend you check out those options, if they are available to you.
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Pete,
Some years ago I approached CIE and asked for samples of their lesson books. They sent about six lesson books (at that time the lesson books were small, just enough to cover the subject matter for that lesson). I was not particular impressed, but that's just my opinion. You should request samples lesson books from them. NRI was a better school, but they no longer exist. CIE, however, may provide the education you seek. If you want to go the extra mile, check out:
http://www.grantham.edu /
They offer associate and bachelor degrees at the engineering level (but their accreditation may not be recognized by traditional resident colleges--meaning some colleges or universities may not allow for the transfer of credits). They are also expensive compared to schools such as CIE, about $4000 per semester. Until circumstances forced me to withdraw, I took their Electronic Technology program and it was very well done. It was this program that finally allowed me to understand parallel and series resonant circuits, such as those used in radios, etc.
For your situation, CIE may be suitable, but do a search on "electronic schools" on Google before making a decision. Also plan on buying books to supplement their program. Also plan on buying an oscilloscope. You can find hobby grade oscilloscopes for as little as $300 and you don't want to know what professional grade scopes cost. A dual trace scope is better (two inputs). The course you are considering doesn't require a scope, but when you get into AC circuitry a hobby grade scope will help you see what in heck is going on.
Note that the non-college level distance programs are designed to make you succeed. In other words, the tests are not that hard. They do this to avoid losing you as a customer who fails the tests and cancels out. It will be up to you to make sure you've obtained the knowledge no matter how easy the tests are. The diplomas are just a piece of paper.
If you are sufficiently motivated, you can buy the books and lab equipment you need to teach yourself for less than a school will charge. Search Amazon for this.
Hope this helps,
// Jim
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If there is one nearby, the DeVry Institute of Technology is a very good school. They have a bunch of them throughout the country, don't know if they offer distance learning.
Good luck.
Joe

or
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