Infrared Cameras

I want to use a couple web cams to see an infrared laser. Does anyone have experience with this? Are there any web cams that can filter out
everything but the IR? Also, where can I find a small IR laser?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
godavemon wrote:

I can speak about a laser, but there are cheap ($40) composite cameras with built in IR LEDS. A black filter should block visable light.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
godavemon wrote:

IR is a wide band, and there are many types of IR lasers, with outputs from about 720 nanometeters to 1500 nanometers, and beyond. I'm going to assume the lower end of the spectrum, near visible light, as this is more typical of the output of diode lasers.
In this case, some common photographic filters are available for this. An RM72 is designed to cut at 720 nanometers; an RM90 at 900 nanometers, and so forth. (Different filter makers use different letter prefixes. Kodak uses a numbering system that does not uniquely identify the cut; a Wratten 87C cuts at 800nm for example.) All of these allow some visible light. You might try a higher filter to cut more visible light.
You'll find these at online photo shops. Gelatin filters are the cheapest. You might also consider simply hacking an old IR remote, the kind that has a dark filter over its LED.
Now as a warning: I experimented with lasers throughout the 80s. I wasn't careful enough when handling IR lasers, and to this day, I have several dark spots in my eyes. The lesions are permanent. FWIW, I think it's better to use a visible light laser if your robot will be among people. At least then people know to avert their eyes. You can work out methods for looking for just the bright red dot (which looks like a white dot on a B/W camera).
-- Gordon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
godavemon wrote:

I forgot to mention that many color Webcams (like color camcorders) incorporate IR blocking filters. This prevents the camera from showing "false colors." Under some types of lighting, for instance, a color Webcam without an IR blocking filter will show lots of skin discoloration, veins, and so forth. Not pleasant.
Though some IR still gets through -- you can see this by flashing a TV remote control into the camera -- you willl probably want to remove the IR blocking filter in order to allow as much of the infrared as possible. The design of some Webcams makes this difficult, where the lens and imager are basically one unit. The filter looks like a clear or slightly tinted piece of plastic. On some really cheap Webcams, the IR blocking filter is part of the lens, and cannot be removed.
A black/white camera will not have an IR blocking filter, but there aren't many B/W Webcams these days. You can try a B/W surveillance camera, which come with both composite video outputs and USB. You can get a composite video to USB adapter if needed. This approach will be more expensive.
-- Gordon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have some. Start with a IR laser and matching filter. Try Jameco for the laser, you need to find one that lists the frequency so you can get the filter. Edmond Sci is a nother place. Also Powertech. Most CCD elements can pick up the IR, the filter is to cut out the visable spectrum.
Jeremy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.