MLW

dan wrote:


I've always been captivated by the bipedal "flamingo" design of ED209. I wonder if there are any inherent advantages to iot, balance wise. I mean, a flamingo can stand for hours on one leg.
Ever come across this stuff in your voluminous research on bipedals?
-- Gordon
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Randy M. Dumse wrote:

new
you
for
its
an
Hi Randy, this sounds very interesting, except for one caveat. The power and program space sound great for a more powerful robot, however at the same time, to build robot apps more powerful than the usual control and sense features, what is really needed I think is a "lot" more available RAM, ie data space for a lot of sensor processing, mapping, etc. 32K doesn't quite cut it. So, possibly a mezzanine RAM board might be nice. A multi-tasking OS would be good too, considering such a cpu could handle it.
For a couple of years, I have been scanning for a "next-step" processor for a robot. One possibility is going all the way to an ITX style board, but they're terrible power hogs, and unsuitable for any robot under maybe 10-20 lbs. The only other thing I've found appealing is the Rabbit, and mainly because the boards come with up to 512K of RAM.
- dan michaels =====================
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I don't disagree. Well, there's the SPI...
No, at some point, even I'd go to an ITX. (You know it hurts me to even say this right?)
But we do have something ARM based with 4Meg RAM in prototype.

Yes, the Rabbit has some advantages... in a very Z8ish sort of legacy prone way. Certainly up til now, if I had to do an embedded Ethernet, I would have looked more closely at the Rabbit. But with the big ARM's just around the corner, with USB slave/host and Ethernet capabilities... maybe not just now.
Have you looked at the new 200MHz+ ARM processors like the MX-1 from Freescale w/BlueTooth accelerator among a whole host of things, or the AT91RM9200 from Atmel? or the LH7A400's from Sharp?
--
Randy M. Dumse
www.newmicros.com
  Click to see the full signature.
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Randy M. Dumse wrote:

"lot"
even
Sounds good about the 4M ARM. Waiting to see it. The ITX'es are powerful, but at 2-3 Amps draw they're out of contention for a small bot. You oughta be able to get some decent brains into a bot without having to go for a 10# SLA battery, etc.

I
capabilities...
the
Thanks for the pointers. I'll check them out.
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www.revely.com has a couple boards using the sharp chips
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You betcha.
There'll be a new 'bot in the coming months, too. Very hush-hush. Probably ServoPod-based (it's the only microcontroller that'll be able to handle it).
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Randy M. Dumse wrote:

Pete Gray wrote:

I used a little tank toy similar to the one you used with a web cam perched on a 6 inch rod to test out some visually guided navigation ideas.
Only a PC would have been able to handle that :)
The problem with the tank design was instead of the stability I assumed it acted like an inverted pendulum. I had to stop the tank to take an image (slow capture causing blurring) but had to wait for the tank to stop rocking!!
It did only have on/off motor control which I thought was sufficient for such a slow machine. I guess with a PIC I could have nulled out the rocking somehow?
- John
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Randy M. Dumse wrote:
Alex Gibson Apr 10, 3:39 pm hide options

Lots of code... nice pic. Actually I have a toy OWI robotic arm that appears stronger? I ran it via some homemade Hbridges with positional feedback and a webcam on its elbow. The Lynxmotion ARM appears to bend at the wrist but not rotate? The OWI arm cannot bend its wrist but can rotate.
One thing it did teach me is toy robot arms only have an educational value, they are not practical. The OWI arm is slow even with 6volts and a real arm needs a sense of touch.. try picking up a small block using just the image from the camera.. and force feedback. There were other little things like slop in the joints (or maybe the gears) so the positional data was dependent on the direction the joint was moving.
We use vision to locate an object but the actual manipulating of the object is mainly based on touch and resistive forces.
A *useful* manipulator would have to at least have the strength and speed of a human arm/hand. So a robot is going to have a need a heavy duty batteries. Powering a mother board may be the least of its problems.

I had previously viewed this but code alone isn't very useful unless you know what it is refering to and of course are familar first with the mnemonics and architecture.

Sort of gathered in one place. A bit like a kitchen pantry chock full of items and I just can't find the tomato sauce (ketchup in your lingo ?). And it is all code without context?

It really depends on how it is put together. A ad hoc collection of stuff is better than nothing but there is more to a good teaching text than that.
You don't want information overload. You need a step by step tutorial based on *one* project. That will cover the basics on how to interface to the hardware and how to translate your ideas into code.
Perhaps Pete Gray's article "Robots & Small-C" in Dr. Dobb's Journal October, 2004 is a good example.
Unfortunately I am unable to read the article as I don't subscribe to DDJ magazine so I can't form a personal judgement.
- John
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blueeyedpop wrote:

Mr.
I wouldn't call it "grandstanding," but I would call it information posting. And when I did ask a very specific question, the Pro-microcontroller mafia took over the conversation.

One of the reasons why I dismiss the advice is because it is not a fact, it is an opinion. You are "outraged" that I disregard your opinion, but you fail to understand that you are, in fact, disregarding my opinion.
And while you guys get all pissy about it, I have tried to debate from a factual informitive stand point, and you guys have called me ignorant (or worse). I have over 20 years professional experience building complex computer systems. I started out doing hardware and moved on to software. I built my first computer in the 1970s, and that was for a robot. I have a very good about what I am doing an the requirements.
If you want to debate techniques, cool, we all learn. 1st be explaining it and 2nd by debating it.

We'll see.

May be.
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"outraged"... Don't recall "outraged" or even outraged. Not even bugged.

discussions.
posting.
it
very
PC
it
but
a
notions.
completely
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blueeyedpop wrote:

Hyperbole and mock outrage :-)
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