wireless microprocessor question

Hello, I'm about to start working on a project that requires an electronic system be controlled wirelessly through the internet. I
need to develop the software (with a GUI) which you can access from the internet that would enable the remote control of the system. the system utilizes pulse width modulation to control a small positioning device. I basically have 2 questions.... 1) can anyone recommend a microprocessor that would be suitable for this task and 2) what language would be best for this? JAVA? C++? or an application like Lab View?
much thanks Joshua
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
panfilero wrote:

Certainly, with the limited playing I've had with LabVIEW, your GUI will be more easily made there. But I haven't gotten to the part where LabVIEW does web interfacing yet.
The problem is there is no one microprocessor that can do all you want (afaik). The remote system will have the GUI on it (unless you want to make application serve up a web page with controlls on it). And almost no unit that can do webserving also does PWM outputs. Seems as a minimum you are looking at two microprocessors at the end effector. Maybe a Mini-ITX for the webserver/internet connectivity and a SSR (Serial Servo Controller) for the servo controller.
-- Randy M. Dumse www.newmicros.com Caution: Objects in mirror are more confused than they appear
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi,
Have a look at the x-port line of products (http://www.lantronix.com /). They have a line of wireless boards with built in webserver and a serial port for communication.with your uC any one ou want.
Regards Ian Dobson
Home of the Atmel based UDP mobile web cam http://www.planet-ian.com All mails scanned with av-filter.pl (F-Prot / perl)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 18 Jan 2007 07:45:28 -0800, panfilero wrote:

hi.
Many MCUs can do PWM but you will want to control your device at a much higher level if it is networked to a GUI...The language I use for my unmanned systems is typically C/C++ on embedded PC104 processors running linux. I've experimented with JAVA and C#.NET operator console GUIs but always seem to come back to C++ for reasons too numerous to mention here.
The questions I have about your project are whether you will require real-time control of your device.
EtherNet + wireless EtherNet = real latency problems
-Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm curious why you say this... What kind of latency problems, and why?
Later, Jon
-------------------------------------------------------------- Jon Hylands snipped-for-privacy@huv.com http://www.huv.com/jon
Project: Micro Raptor (Small Biped Velociraptor Robot) http://www.huv.com/blog
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

With the radio path (or any other unreliable transfer system) you can either have a
a) realtime, unreliable connection b) reliable, but non-realtime connection (e.g. retransmissions)
but you can not have guarantied reliable and realtime connections.
Especially WLANs etc. working in the 2.45 GHz ISM band can suffer from all kind of devices, including the microwave oven.
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You might try www.datahunter.com they make reasonalby priced 802.11G to RS232 adapters and such.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hotwing wrote:

You could also try:
http://www.merlinwireless.co.uk
RS232 -> Bluetooth and RS232-> Wireless e.g. Nemo10 and LS100,LS100W.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Totally true, but you could generalize the statement to "any form of communication"
Regards, Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hello, Joshua,
I am a Java programmer by profession. Robotics is just my hobby. I like Java very much and I've done several monitoring control applications, using Java.
1) If we are talking about high level of the application (general design of the application, middleware, etc.) then I can recommend Java. A lot of proven technologies based on this language. I use Java/SWING for desktop application and for applets. Java is designed for network projects and it is good for this. Also there is a way to compile Java+SWT (IBM GUI library) using GCC/GCJ to native code (to EXE file, if you use Windows). But SWING GUI from SUN is much more reach API.
2)If we are talking about microprocessor part of the system, then most suitable language is C/C++. (Also you can use assembler). Java is not so good in low level, where you program the processor itself (because of several reasons). The only exception is J2ME - special version of Java for small devices, like cell phones. I use this kind of Java for my hobby project, where you can drive on-line your small robot with cell phone on a board and see - where the robot is going. See: http://www.RoboHobby.com
3) Java is free and there are a lot of Java-based technologies, which you can use for free - Tomcat JSP server, JBoss J2EE server, etc.
4) Java has a really big community. You can always find examples and tutorials - how to do this or that. And of course, you can ask me about Java - where to start and how to use it.
E-mail: Oleg[at]RoboHobby[dot]com.
.
panfilero wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sounds like you want a micro with 802.11, a network stack, some kind of http web server for the GUI, plus the usual embedded peripherals for PWM. You'll want some kind of hardware counter/timer array to generate the pulse stream, since the processor will have to handle network interrupts. You might look at one of the ARM7 embedded controllers, plenty of memory, timers, and high speed serial ports. Use one of the serial ports to talk to a LAN module for 802.11b/g, such as the Lantronix Xport series. There are plenty of resources for ARMs, such as GNU C compiler (with Eclipse IDE) and the FreeRTOS operating system. Jack Peacock
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.