A retro-rocket "parachute" for Rocketman

Any comments on this invention?
A retro-rocket "parachute" for Rocketman
The personal "Jet-brake" aims to reduce stopping or braking time to
the minimum and hence maximise freefall time and replace the parachute. It must use an onboard computer to calculate weight (probably for a pre-set weight only) against distance from ground using optical/radio beam. This calculation automates the exact moment to ignite what is effectively a personal retro-rocket. Minimum stopping time would naturally depend on maximum G force that the user wished to experience. Computer control would be critical or else user would come to a halt too soon and hover/fall or too much and he would rise back up. Without any calculations, a rough guess at stopping time would be 3 seconds.
Design is only intended as an emergency or sports parachute and not a lift device. Hence there is no steering control which reduces costs and also the complications of mechanical directional controls. This lack of facility recognises that the stopping times would be so brief as to make window of opportunity to use and adjust steering perhaps negligible. The use of an option to steer made even less desirable as the user's perceptions would be under some distortion due to G force during that short braking period. However advanced prototypes might include a GPS accessory to identify safe trajectory line ups while freefall manoeuvres can still be made based on ground maps of potential hazards.
Such a device could be a one-off use device to reduce refill/safety issues. Finally it is to be hoped for that the design would be able to be worn and used without any special clothing. Hence the insulations necessary to protect from the jet-rocket exhaust might include a small but powerful refrigeration unit. The Australians invented the refrigerated vest only a few years ago.
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snipped-for-privacy@hush.com (Diginomics) wrote:

In principal it should work fine. A weight sensor in the shoe of the victim, er, pilot could properly calibrate it. Stability is CRITICAL so a steering chute would still be needed and a minimum of training to assure victim, er, pilot is clued into the criticality of orientation.

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Jerry Irvine, Box 1242, Claremont, California 91711 USA
Opinion, the whole thing. <mail to: snipped-for-privacy@gte.net>
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