Protecting parachutes

TRA's decertification of Skippy's motors is the cause.
Do NOT send any $$$ to Skippy. Trust us.
Reply to
Tim Fuentes
Loading thread data ...
That depends on how much wadding you used, what kind it was, how much space is available for wadding, etc. Your current wadding may be inefficient, or you may simply need to use more of it.
Lettuce (the "greenleaf" or "redleaf" type) makes a great wadding especially if you don't have a lot of room. It doesn't take much, and is damp so it extinguishes burning particles and cools hot gases before they reach the chute.
There are alternates to wadding, such as using a piston or a baffle. Pistons push the chute out while keeping it separate from the hot gas and particles. Baffles filter out particles and cool the gas somewhat.
Reply to
RayDunakin
Use Nomex chute protectors. Or use 'dog barf'; borate treated shredded celluose, available in huge bales as wall insulation from home centers.
Reply to
Andrew MacMillen
Deployment bag.
Reply to
Mark
I sent up a homemade rocket with a Teleflite G-75 motor and put plenty of
wadding but my nylon chute still melted. Is there a way to better protect my
chutes?
Reply to
Mike
Is that similar to what we use to pack our chutes in for skydiving? Is it reliable?
Reply to
Mike
Try a "parachute cup"
I believe Tim VanMilligan describes this method in "Model Rocket Design and Construction."
No wadding needed, but the airframe should be larger than, say, 2.6 "
Gus
Reply to
Augustus McCrae
Yes and Yes.
From:
formatting link
"A parachute deployment bag serves multiple purposes. "Protect the parachute from the ejection charge. "Bags are usually made of Nomex cloth.
"Allows the bridle and suspension lines to be pulled tight before the parachute opens, preventing a large "jerk" on the system when the parachute inflates.
"Allows the parachute to move away from the rocket before it opens, helping prevent it from becoming tangled with the bridle, nose cone, fins, etc.
Deployment bags should be used on all HPR vehicles. (IMHO). ;)
Reply to
Mark
I've seen cases where the deployment bag _caused_ a deployment failure. The pilot chute was unable to pull the main out of the bag.
Reply to
RayDunakin
More correctly, the failure was caused by the person who packed the main. Properly packed and setup, the pilot 'chute is able to easily and freely pull the bag off of the main.
Wad it up and shove it in, and you're asking for trouble.
-Kevin
Reply to
Kevin Trojanowski
Thar's more 'n one way to skin a deployment bag. ;)
Reply to
Mark
Strangest thing I ever saw was my son's Mini Magg come in flat with an unfurled chute. Ejection happened right on top, and the chute and rocket fell side by side. The nylon chute was rolled up just like it always had been and ole Newton played a trick on us.
steve
Reply to
default
I have heard baglock can occur if the wrong kind of elastics are used, we were trained for bag lock its a shame rockets dont have backup chutes.
Reply to
Mike
For my camera rocket I will use a system where the chute is inside the payload bay and upon ejection a deployment vent opens and the air pushes out the chute. I'm not sure how reliable this will be, but the chute will have no contact with the ejection charge.
Reply to
Mike
What did you expect from a guy named after a cookie? ; )
Randy
Reply to
Randy
It's not a cookie, it's a cake! :)
Reply to
Dave Grayvis
I fold the shroud lines and use rubberbands to hold them in place for orderly deplayment... but they 'pop-off' as the lines are made taught.
Reply to
Mark
Sorry, I forgot.
Randy
Reply to
Randy
And fruit!
Reply to
Christopher Deem

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.