Mach and Altitude Sims

RockSim doesn't allow one to designate alternating wind and speed directions in regards to altitude layers...

In fact, it *seems* the altitude of the rocket is independent of the wind speed (and thus the angle of attack), and appears to only influence the horizontal 'drift' of the rocket in ascent and decent.

Obviously this cannot be correct.

Since I will be attempting a Mach 2+, 30Kft+ flight... the simulations are very important.

Ideas? Suggestions? Clarifications in Logic?

Also curious about nosecone material... a buddy says that at Mach 2+ my nosecone will melt if made of aluminum. He suggests graphite... is this necessary?

Thanks in advance...

Others interested in wind speed, direction, altitude, etc.,

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Reply to
Mark
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Apogee also sells software called "Splash"

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but I can't tell from the description whether it can account for wind sheer at different altitudes. doesn't look like it...

best fun would be if it did, and could get the real-time NOAA data and use it!

Reply to
Cliff Sojourner

RockSim 6x allows for 2d flight with wind. There is at least one layer of wind shear specified by the user. The altitude is most certainly affected by the wind.

Rocksim 7x allows for variable wind and thermals (still 2d). I am not sure about multiple shear layers, though.

Ken

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Reply to
Ken Karbon

No, I don't think it does... not to disparage them. Pretty decent software.

Yup! couldn't agree more!

Just imagine being able to actually catch your rocket after a 30K plus ride because you were able to properly plan your flight! ;)

Reply to
Mark

I would be interested... I've estimated the high-end temperature could reach

900F...

Reply to
Mark

But where would you fly one of "my" motors?

Jerry

Reply to
Jerry Irvine

The highest altitude flight I have ever seen caught was 8000 feet AGL.

Jerry

Reply to
Jerry Irvine

I doubt it. Dual deployment is a miracle.

Reply to
Jerry Irvine

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Reply to
Jerry Irvine

Impressive... but I think you can fly them just about anywhere there is a decent patch of 'public' or 'government' land.

I think the FAA waiver ceiling for amatuer rockets is about 100,000 feet... above that, you enter the realm of the 'professional'... then it's a whole new tangle of red tape and massive fees. ;)

Reply to
Mark

Good advice... I'll give it a shot... it's time I spent the money and upgraded anyway.

Do you know how it handles rockets once they reach +Mach speed?

There seems to be a problem there in version 6...

Reply to
Mark

Truly... and it's a miracle that one can actually believe in! ;)

Reply to
Mark

All the more reason to DIY instead of using a canned program. While it is not hard, it will take some time, especialy if this your rocket simulation program. Rocsim is good for the masses, but writing your own has merit as well.

Alan

Reply to
Alan Jones

just out of curiosity, what are the current records for HPR altitude and mach speed? or what with current engines what is possible? shockie B)

Reply to
shockwaveriderz

Hmmm... the more I think about this, the more I agree with you. In fact, most of it could be done quite easily in Excel.

Reply to
Mark

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