AMT-->1940 Sedan Delivery-->detail question-->Newbie

Hi Everyone,
Just starting to try my hand at modeling and bought a AMT 1940 Sedan Delivery. From doing some googling, I know this is an old kit.
My question is what to do about the molded in details.
Should I
a: paint over them and add some detailed brake lines, etc.
or
b: try to get a itty-bitty brush and paint them the correct colors, etc.
What would you recommend?
Sorry to bother anyone if this has been asked elsewhere.
PS: One quick one on this kit do the frame rails go inside the plastic body where it fits on top of the fenders or outside? The directions are not clear. Any tips? I don't want to break anything.
many thanks for your help.
Tony
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Tony,
Prewar Fords are near and dear to my heart for sure!
Yes, AMT/Ertl's '40 Ford Sedan Delivery is an old kit. The basics of it, chassis, fenders, engine, hood and chrome parts date from 1959-60 (this kit started out as a 1940 Ford Coupe, then a modified reissue of it as a 1939-40 Ford 2dr Sedan followed in 1960, with the Sedan Delivery version coming about 1966-67).
A bit of "pre-assembling" test fitting of the major components (frame, fenders, body) will show you that the fenders of this one fit on top of the frame, and the body then fits down on top of the fender unit, all the way down to the upper surface of the running boards.
As for molded on details, there aren't a lot on this chassis, due to its age, the main details being the exhaust system and the gas tank (in the correct position for a sedan or coupe, but shouldn't be visible on the sedan delivery, which had its fuel tank on top of the frame, but below the load floor, just behind the driver's seat, with the filler cap on the right side of the body, just behind the side door.
1939-48 Fords had their brake master cylinder mounted in the X-section of the chassis on the driver's side, just below the driver's feet, with a short length of brake line running into the left frame rail channel, where the lines are pretty much hidden from view. The brake line then splits in this frame rail, one line to the front, the other to the rear. The lines then split at the front crossmember, with a line running on top of this crossmember to the right front, and the same was done at the rear crossmember, to send brake fluid to the right rear brake. The brake lines were coupled at the sides of the frame rails to flexible hoses going to the top of each front brake drum backing plate, and in the rear to the forward side of each rear backing plate. Unfortunately, with this kit, you will have to "fudge" the brake line hookups a bit.
Engine wiring is very basic on a flathead V8 Ford, consisting of an ignition wire from the dash, a wire from battery to coil, then 8 individual plug wires from distributor to plugs. One needn't worry about the firing order when wiring a model flathead, as the stock distributor (that bulbous-looking detail on the front of the engine has a cap on each side, the plug wires being divided inside the housings themselves, and were loomed along the upper side of the cylinder heads, with each wire arching out of the loom to its respective plug.
Stock detail colors for a factory-fresh 40 Ford were: Engine, bellhousing and transmission;dark semi-gloss green. Generator, starter, and air cleaner were gloss black; carburetor a dull metallic silver-grey. Plug wires of the day were covered in a varnished fabric shieldingwhich when new was a golden tan in color.
The seat included in this kit is incorrect, as sedan deliveries did not use a passenger car bench seat, but rather a bucket seat for the driver (standard on all), with an optional fully folding, bucket seat for a passenger (optional). If you can find one, the Lindberg 1934 Ford Pickup kit (also an old AMT tool!) has as custom seats these very same sedan delivery seats, but take the time to putty in the pleated upholstery pattern, as commercial car seats had smooth imitation leather.
While all 40 Ford sedan deliveries were trimmed out on the exterior as "Deluxe" cars, the interior was pretty spartan. Upholstery was entirely imitation leather in a dark brown, with the dashboard being a glossy chocolate brown, but with Deluxe car chrome trim abounding. Steering wheel was the same chocolate brown all over, with no chrome trim on it at all. The entire headlining, as with the side panels in the rear was also dark brown in color, the headlining being fabric, with masonite side panels. The load floor was wood, with skid strips, but was glossy black enamel.
Body colors were the same as for any Deluxe Ford in 1940. One thing to note is that the outer front grille panels are body color (center part of the grille is plated in the kit, which is correct), with 3 chrome strips on each side grille. The windshield was set in rubber channel, but with a chrome center post. Running boards were covered in black rubber. Wheels were the same color as the body, unless otherwise specified (this was a dealer-installed option). Whitewall tires were very seldom purchased by commercial car users, but if you do want white walls, in 1940, white wall tires had white sidewalls on both sides (inner as well as outer) of the tire, which was standard for whitewalls prior to WW-II.
The engraved "Ford Deluxe" script on the hubcaps was dark blue on all Deluxe Fords, this can be done by brushing a bit of Testors #1111 blue on the scripts, then quickly wiping away the excess, leaving the blue in the engraved scripts.
To see the available colors for a 1940 Ford Deluxe, go to
www.autocolorlibrary.com They have the 1940 Ford paint chips imaged there.
For further detailing information, just do a Google search for "1940 Ford" or "1940 Ford Sedan Delivery".
Hope this helps!
Art Anderson
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Hi,
Wow! Many thanks for the great information!
I appreciate you taking the time to help a new guy out!
What would you suggest about the door handles?
They are really small-->would bare metal foil stuff work, or could I home-make some?
Tony
Also, any recommendations for my next kit? Would like to stay in the 1932-57 years? Any preferred kits?
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Tony wrote:

I would suggest one of the Revell '40 Fords. They just released a stunning '40 Ford Standard coupe. There's a '40 Ford Deluxe convertible out there too. Revell also did a couple of '37 Ford trucks, a pickup and a panel van.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
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Well, yeah, if you're willing to overlook the stunning '57 Chrysler 300 ... ;^) -- C.R. Krieger (Been there; built enough '40s)
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Or, the newly released AMT/Ertl '56 Thunderbird!
Art Anderson
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EmilA1944 wrote:

Or, the older Lindberg '53 Ford. I just picked up one of the convertibles before Christmas. Mine seems to lack a decal sheet but I won't miss the pace car markings. If you don't mind that it's an older moulding there's a '49 Mercury coupe from RC/Ertl.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
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I just went to our local shop and saw the Revell models last night.
wow! Seems to be light years ahead of AMT, but I guess most of the AMT's are re-issues of old kits, right?
Then again, I saw the AMT Fireball 500 which I might try if I can put my 40 together without gluing my fingers together :)
thanks to all for the help! I started the underbody last night and engine.
Tony
On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 02:25:53 +0000, Bill Banaszak wrote: <snip>

<snip>
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