balsa wood model--glue?

Hey I just got the 1903 wright flyer balsa wood model. I never built a balsa wood model before and I keep reading everywhere that CA glue is
the preferred. Can I use regular super glue or krazy glue, since I believe both are cyanoacrylate, or do I need some special formulation of CA. Any hekp would be appreciated--thanks.
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on 10/12/2007 1:44 PM TheKeith said the following:

I would suspect that you would need the thicker CA glue. Me, I would just use regular carpenter's glue.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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yeah I would definately use regular wood glue, liek titebond or something but, I read that the CA glues have a 12-second set time as opposed to the 30-minute set time with the wood glues, which means I'd need to use clamps most likely, correct?
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on 10/12/2007 3:03 PM TheKeith said the following:

If you are in hurry to finish it fast, find a hobby store that stocks the heavier CA glue, sometimes called 'gap filling' CA. Otherwise, unless the joints are under stress, no clamping may be necessary. If you do need clamps, the spring clothespins work fine, or you can buy a set of small plastic clamps from Harbor Freight for a few dollars. I have this 22 piece set for $5. http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber26 Even the smallest ones have a jaw opening of over 1"
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Yes, use the GEL variety, the thicker, slower setting stuff. I also use white glue, which is cheaper. I use the white glue for assemblies that are going to be pinned down for awhile, CA when I need the quicker set. I also use the CA for areas that will be finished, because the white glue is harder to sand and paint.
Also, I have built these as shelf scale models, covering the metal covered areas with sheet styrene. I use CA for gluing the styrene to balsa.
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Go to the hobby store and get some CA. The RC guys use it to build their airplanes. It dries very fast, no clamping required.

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I got back into modelling by first building a Guillows Spitfire, a favorite kit when younger. I used CA - for about three minutes. The porous balsa not only absorbed the CA but it went right through the balsa to my fingers. I had to borrow my wife's nail polish remover to remove the balsa from my fingers.
Use Elmer's Wood Glue or plain Elmer's White Glue.

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About the time it takes to set, I see. You made several mistakes. Once you rectify those errors, you'll find that CA's are THE adhesive s of chi=oice for wood nmodels,specially, balsa models.
1. I mentioned the fact that the closer the wood-to-wood fit, the better the joint. Use really sharp tools and get a very good,accurate fit before you apply the cement.
2. parts should be held together by pins to the board and/or other kinds of clamps. Never use your fingers as a clamp. with CA. What were your fingers doing any where near the joint.
3.You used far, far, far too much of the stuff, so it slopped all aver the place and on to your fingers. The tip, rspecially fo thin CA is much too gross. You can buy applicator tips that are like a fine hypodermic needle, so you squeeze out only one tiny drop at a time ... just at the joint and bowheres else. I sometimes put a drop on a toothpicjk nd touch that to the joint. it wicks in an without any slop. I also use dental pick, which have the dvantage that you can clean them. There are many other rypes of applicators you can use.

Which is great, because it really strenghtens the joint. but it went right through the balsa to my fingers.
Goes to show, yet again why theGullows kits were the worst ones on the market. They used only the cheapest, softest balsa. Better balsa does not wick so violently.

Good hobby shops also sell de-bond (bond disolver) which is far more effective than nail polish remover. Acetone also works better. Always have some debonder around, because we all make mistakes.. and even after years of using, also occasionally glue fingers together.

A poor substitute for tight-bond or plain Elmer's White Glue. An even more inferior product compared to tight bond.
Since you're new to CA, note that it is the adhesive of choice when you cut your finger with the sharp scalpel. Jut push the joint together to a good approximation, dab the excess blood off and put on a drop of CA. Stings, but works perfectly.Can often (and is used by doctors to avoid stitches. Of course you can use the "medical" CA at$5.00 /cut, but hobby CA is just as sterile an works as well. Let's see you do that with Elmer's
Boris
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I agree that the balsa in Guillows kits leaves a lot to be desired. But I do not find that a problem. I find Guillows kits among the best for scale accuracy. If, as frequently the case, I am not going to fly a kit, but build it for shelf scale, I replace balsa stringers with basswood or styrene anyway. I also replace a lot of the sheetwood parts with styrene if it is going to be visible (as inside the cockpit) 'cause it finishes easier.
I am building their Dauntless and this kit gives alternate plans for several areas- a flying model surface and a scale surface, such as tail surfaces. Also alternate cockpit areas if you are not running the rubber motor through it.
I am covering it with sheet styrene with embossed rivets.
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wrote:

I was a flying model (free-flight rubber (Wakefield) and gliders) builder. As such I quickly learned that so-called "flying scale" (at least for rubber and low powered gas) was an oxymoron. Flying scale did not become a reality untilgood engines came along. at first, only for U-contrlol. Now, of course, despite the many aerodynamic compromises one has to make very realistic RC scale is possible and thriving.

Before I dropped aircraft in favor of priod ships, I built many plastic scale models. Those kits (with upgrades)are available with outrageous level of detail sufficient to satisfy the pickiest rivet counter-- so why bother with all the compromises of building balsa scale? The various kits offered by Model Expo of the wright flyer, and WWI Jennie look very appealing to meThey are built-up, ultra realistic, very big, and yo my mind, a far more satisfactory exercise than doing aullows balsa-based kit.
I replace balsa stringers with

In other words, you are using the kit as a sort of 3D set of plans.

That is somewhat extreme in the realm of kit-basing. But hey: Why do people climb mountains? mostly for the challenge, and because they can. Good luck to you. Post some pics when you're done. Paull Gullows will sit up in his grave, smile, and say:that's what I intended all along.
Boris

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I hope so. Paul was one of my heros. My very first model was a Guillows Aeronca. This was in about 1947 (before plastics). Never got it to fly- it got damaged before trimming. But I was so thrilled to complete it after several years of unsuccessful attempts at building "stick models." While I likely built far more Comet models than Guillows, I always felt that the latter were a cut above the Comet ones I could afford.
Glad to see Estes has continued the Guillow line, but sad to see they terminated the Comet line. What was the Comet founder- Bill someone. He lived to a ripe old age, dying only a couple of years ago (know that even if I cannot come up with his name at present).
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on 10/15/2007 9:27 AM Don Stauffer in Minnesota said the following:

I, for one, would like to see some photos of the construction and finished model.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Don Stauffer in Minnesota wrote:

Me, I'd just wait for the 1/18 scale Dauntless to eventually come out: http://www.admiraltoys.com/Retailers/SBD/SBD1.html
Pat
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That is why you need to use the gel form of CA on balsa. It dries slower than the regular CA, but far quicker than white glue.
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