Re: Airfix Gladiator

Still no confirmation on kit numbers, but this is from Air International, >August, 1986:
>
>"The Gladiator II was the subject of one of the very bearliest of the >original
>Series 1-two bob as they were then, or 10p in today's Monopoly oney-of >Airfix's
>1/72nd scale plastic bagged kits." Some snippage. "Some years later, Airfix
>revamped the kit as a Gladiator I, cleaning up the moulds, switching to >silver
>plastic and offering a much better set of decals."
>
>I'll check back when and if I find the appropriate kit numbers
Airfix issued the Gladiator I (in siver plastic) in 1956. The only
aircraft kit they issued before 1956 was the Spitfire. If 1956
is "some years later" then this supposed issue must have
been issued in '53 or '54. I don't belive this Gladiator II ever
existed, and that it is a figment of the reviewer's imagination.
Perhaps he was thinking of the old Penguin kit. I'd also
suggest that while references in old "Model Enthusiast"
articles might be useful in directing one to further enquiry,
they are hardly reliable evidence for the existence of a kit.
PT
Reply to
Giessenlad
Loading thread data ...
The above was written by Tom Young
And I replied as above.
I'm now replying to myself, to further elucidate. This began with the "Pavla Cr42" thread. If you don't have an unabiding interest in old Airfix kits you might want to pass on the following essay.
This will deal with the first three issues of the Gloster Gladiator by Airfix, and will mention their first kit, the Supermarine Spitfire.
Old Airfix kits are commonly identified by "Type" issues. Type I, Type II, Type III, etc. This identification refers to the packaging and has nothing to do with the "Series" the kits were issued in, which was based on size and cost. Type I (1956-58) had very crude artwork, which I compare to coloring book art which as been colored in. The left 40% or so of the header is red in color. The Airfix logo is centered at the top of this red field. The two exceptions to this rule are the Fokker Triplane and Auster Antarctic, which have blue instead of red background fields. Type II (1959-63) Had basic artwork, which I compare to comic book art. The background color was half white and half blue,yellow,or red. A vertical bar in a contrasting color seperated these two background colors. The Airfix logo was at the bottom of this bar. Type III (1963-73) had Professional quality artwork. The Airfix logo appeared on the bottom of the right hand side of the header, over a small white rectagular field. Bearing the above in mind, the first Airfix a/c kit was a generic Spifire which was a scaled down copy the Aurora kit. It was faithfully copied down to the molded in pilot head, bombs, and even squadron codes and a/c serial. The first issues, I'm told, were were even issued in the same color blue plastic. My Type I copy of this kit, issued in 1956, is molded in silver, but I don't doubt that it was molded in blue, given it's direct relation to the Aurora kit. The header artwork depicts a blue colored model of the Spitfire kit displayed on a rectangular stand. The stand in the kit is a scaled down version of the Aurora stand.
This brings us to the Airfix Gladiator kit. The earliest kit I have is the Type I (1335) issued in '56. It is a generic issue, "Gloster Gladiator" being the only information provided on the header leaflet. On closer inspection, it does however, have a three blade prop and wartime markings. The next issue is the Type II, also kit 1335. This kit has a two blade prop, and was issued in '59, with prewar markings. Again, the header simply refers to this kit as a generic "Gloster Gladiator". However, it would be a real stretch to refer to this issue as "revamped", the new prop, decals, and the new eliptical stand, being the only difference between them. The molds have not been "cleaned up" in any way. While the decals are different, they are not "much better" IMHO. The following issue, the Type III, changed the kit number to 82, when Airfix resequenced their kit numbers. Again there was no upgrade to the molds, the only difference between this and the Type II being the different art on the header leaflet, and a newer style of stand. The header is finally a bit specific, identifying it as a "Gladiator Mk I" Well, that's my take on the "different" Airfix Gladiator kits. I don't believe the Type I was ever issued in blue plastic. The Type I header does depict a blue colored model of the Gladiaror sitting on a rectangular stand. I feel this was a carry over from the blue color on the Spitfire header ( which was originally blue because of it's Aurora roots, as noted) and the kit was never shot in this color. I suspect the "Model Enthusiast" reviewer merged his memories of these two facts and came up with a Gladiator molded in blue plastic. If anyone has solid information on a blue issue Airfix Gladiator, I'd like to hear from you. In conclusion, Airfix did issue a Mark II Gladiator, though they didn't identify it as such. Then, using the same mold, they issued a Mark I, although, again, they did not identify it as such. They only difference between the two was a change of props, and new decals. Some might consider this to be 2 different kits. I don't. PT

Reply to
Giessenlad
It may have, but the only difference was probably the label on the bag--especially since the most obvious difference was the prop, and some II's had the 2-blade prop retrofitted.
Reply to
Tom Cervo
what's the story on the lindberg glads? i think they are neat little kits. detail the interior, rig it up and it looks like a glad. i found a defenders of malta decal sheet, so after the glad comes the azure spit..which one is best?
Reply to
e
If memory serves (and these days, that's asking a ~lot~), the Lindy Glad started life coming from Inpact (out of England), with the molds then going to Pyro, Life-Like (maybe) and finally to Lindberg. The four Inpact British fighters (indeed, ALL of their 1:48 aircraft) are well designed with a lot of detail, relatively easy builds and reasonably accurate dimensions. Are they Tamigawa? No, but for the price, you DO get a nice model.
-- John The history of things that didn't happen has never been written. . - - - Henry Kissinger
Reply to
The Old Timer
i have a life like, it is the same, and like the early lindbergs, came in a high, square box with some wire.
Reply to
e
About the only difference that I ever noticed between the Inpact and the Lindies (et al) was with the pioneer aircraft. The re-pops had solid opaque wheels with the spokes molded on. The Inpact used clear plastic. Once the tires were painted and the spokes highlighted, it looked really great! I wish that someone would bring out them again (and maybe a few additional!).
-- John The history of things that didn't happen has never been written. . - - - Henry Kissinger
Reply to
The Old Timer
wow, thanks for a good detailing tip. the glad-in-progress will be a malta defender. i know there is a cockpit set for the roden, but i think a scratchpit will be doable.
Reply to
e
yep, I got two of the Lindberg Glads at an estate sale and they had wire and a high square box. They both were easy to build and looked good when finished. In fact they were my return to modeling after a 30 year absense and being laid up after a rookie mistake on a motorcycle( don't bank over in a diesel oil slick) Mike IPMS
Reply to
Mike Keown
i've been lucky....i dump in the sand.
Reply to
e
Wow, glad you survived!
I had a mate who had the same accident happen due to lorry drivers just using a rag to cap the fuel tank (which usually fell out) and he hit a diesel slick coming off a roundabout (in the UK) which is different to petrol as you can't see it. He was no rooky as he worked on that bike everyday so don't be hard on yourself.
Glad you're okay though,
Richard.
Reply to
Richard Brooks
them rotarys are killers.
Reply to
e
worst is hot pipes...sand ain't bad if you know hoe to fall. but cement rash, now that's the real pain. when i see the idiots riding in shorts, i cringe. the very least is jeans, hi tops and a cotton t.
Reply to
e
That sounds soft until one remembers what sandpaper is made of. Ouch.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
Many, Many Moons ago coming South on Route 26 in Maryland, just over the Monocacy River bridge, here comes a bike past me going like blue blazes. Guy in jeans, boots and a jacket, his girl is showing off, shorts and bikini top, no helmet on either. The road throws a curve right there and it was wet due to heavy rains and some overflowing. He lost it. I can still see this guy sliding along the wet road with his head going bumpety-bump and blood and whatever flying. You can guess what the chick looked like. He didn't make it; she did but, I bet she hasn't worn a bikini since.
Bill Shuey "People who wear a helmet have something to protect"
Reply to
William H. Shuey
none of my bikes has passenger pegs. and i always wear a helnet. and wet roads either slow me down or stop me.
Reply to
e
At least the rescue crews have something to put the parts in. :)
and wet roads either slow me down or stop me.
I imagine in California folks stop what they're doing and gawk when it rains. Yeah, right!
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
not in mojave, kemo sabe. vegas does that. we got a quarter inch in feb, 2 days later it was spring. damndest thing i ever saw.
Reply to
e
Didn't somebody out there 'enjoy' a flood this year?
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
Back to the original topic, please.
Does anyone have the various 1/72 Airfix Gladiators?
Can anyone verify one with a two blade prop and another with a three blade prop?
Tom
Reply to
Maiesm72

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.