Re: Bad Temperature for Styrene??? Need Solutions....

in the SF Bay Area. came home to a hot house with an attic temp of 130 > degrees.
>
> pretty sure nothing is living up there now, but god knows what the heat
> has done to all my long term storage stuff.
>
> when does styrene start to deform/soften to be a problem???
>
>
> and to solve it. I've always seen those spinning things on top of
> roofs. Heard they spin automatically by the heat exchange with the
> outside and/or are powered by electricity.
>
> also thought of a fan inside the dormer window.
>
>
> ideas???
>
> and their ain't no place downstairs for 300+ models......
>
>
>
> Craig
Many of the decal sheets will suffer (or be rendered unusable);
but the plastic is pretty resilient. My parent's attic is that
hot (if not more, being here in Texas...), and I have had kits up
there for years, some 20 years. Even vac-forms have survived.
I don't recall any being heat damamged. Now, I did once leave
a sprue sitting on the dashboard, while the car sat in the summer
sun. It was a total loss. Perhaps the intense heat, with the
direct sunlight, in the confined space of a closed car?
Reply to
Greg Heilers
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decals have been stored in a hall closet for years. those are fine. that's the one I did learn early...
Craig
Reply to
Craig
Speaking as a long term desert dweller- Turbine roof ventilators work by using the wind to spin a fan that ventilates your attic. You also need good vents to give the vents a pathway for air exchange. They really work, but it's a good idea to cover them with a trash bag in the fall, because they will suck the heat out of your attic in the winter when you don't want much ventilation. BTW, I keep my stock of kits in the closet of the spare bedroom that doubles as my office and library. My garage gets to about 140 F in the summer sometimes.
Reply to
Jim Atkins
Since I do all my modeling and store my completeds in the attic...there is a window A/C. As to the melted sprue in the car that another poster mentioned...the air in a closed car in direct sunlight gets to...what?200+ degrees?So I can see that happening...
Reply to
Eyeball2002308
I remember a kid in our neighbourhood back in the '60s who bought a bunch of 45s at a flea market and put them in the package tray of his dad's car. That was an ugly sight.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Bill Banaszak
Polystyrene starts to soften between 65 and 100 C, which in old imperial units used by Americans is 149F and 212F. The main property which affects the softening temperature is the molecular weight of the polystyrene molecule.
Tim Brimelow
Reply to
tim brimelow

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