Why cut from sprue this way?

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I want to know why the 2nd method is the right way to cut from the sprue
with a side cutter? I haven't bought a side cutter yet coz I've been doing
away with a nail cutter and nail file. Hehehe... *covering my ears coz
someone might have a violent reaction of how I'm doing this*

Reply to
Chad
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Some side cutters are designed to cut flush right to the edge of the part, but everyday sidecutters can fracture the detailed plastic part if you try to cut too close. It can be safer to leave a small plastic nub and sand or file it smooth. You can cut closer if you score the sprue connection on both sides with an X-Acto knife before using the side cutter (if the sprue gate is unusually thick, score the plastic on all four sides). Instead of fracturing randomly, the plastic will fail along the score marks, leaving a cleaner cut that requires less filing and sanding. GPO
Reply to
Lafimprov
I've always used my cutters as illustrated in image #1. That way, you can get the cutter right up to the part with minimum cleanup. Maybe Tamiya's cutters are designed differently but, if so, why reinvent the wheel? I've been using a Xuron Sprue Cutter which has worked well -- again, with the 'flat' side of the cutter towards the part to be removed. No idea why Tamiya would have you do it this way.
Frank Kranick
Chad wrote:
Reply to
Francis X. Kranick, Jr.
I have been using the Tamiya side cutters for almost 20 years now. Once you try them you will never go back to anything else. I gave away a few sets as gifts to a few friends and they threw their Xuron cutters in the trash! These things will trim the smallest part from the tree co clean I have actually not had to use any cleaning! Its like a hot knife slicing thru butter. Well worth the $32 I pay for them. I get a new pair every 4-5 years or so. Just remember to never use them for cutting wire of any kind. When I replace my cutters I then delegate the old one to snipping wire.
Reply to
Scott A. Bregi AKA The Model Hobbit
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I want to know why the 2nd method is the right way to cut from the sprue with a side cutter? I haven't bought a side cutter yet coz I've been doing away with a nail cutter and nail file. Hehehe... *covering my ears coz someone might have a violent reaction of how I'm doing this*>>
Nail cutters work well simply because their blade design is very similar to sidecutters specifically made for modeling. If you look at a cross-section of a pair of regular electrician's sidecutters you'll see that they are concave on both sides of the cutting edge. Actual modeling sidecutters are concave on one side and dead flat on the other. Now look closely at your nail clippers and you'll see the same thing--concave on one side, flat on the other. I don't mean the curved part where ya stick yer finger/toe, I mean if you put a straight edge perpendicular to the cutting surface inside that curve you'll see it's flat.
When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return. --Leonardo Da Vinci
Reply to
Disco -- FlyNavy
"Scott A. Bregi AKA The Model Hobbit" wrote in message news: snipped-for-privacy@cox.net...
That's a little expensive over there. Only $15 here or 800 Philippine pesos. Is that the Tamiya side cutter that sold as a stand alone or did it come with a set? $15 is already expensive for any side cutter in my city. That's a preposterous price considering the ones you buy at the hardware store only costs $2 here.
Reply to
Chad
cross-section of
Yeah, well, some nail cutters I've seen are curved outwards. This is the type I like coz I don't have to push deeper when cutting. :D
Reply to
Chad
in article snipped-for-privacy@mb-m25.aol.com, Disco -- FlyNavy at snipped-for-privacy@aol.com.mil.nav wrote on 6/21/04 9:41 AM:
I've been using various brands of side cutters for years, Xuron at the moment (because they were a door prize) but the kind of cut I make sort of depends on what I'm cutting off. I know that the Inside part of the cut seems to compress the plastic less than that on the Flat. Still, I tend to do the final trim with a pair of Revlon cutical cutters and finish with a sanding stick.
MB
Reply to
Milton Bell
There are a couple of reasons to use side cutters that way.
First, the outer edge of the part is often convex, as in the photo. If you try to cut it exactly at the corner where the sprue meets the part, you'll be left with a flat spot.
Second, the cutters don't just cut, they also pinch, crush, stretch, and tear the plastic. Even the sharpest cutters do this to some extent.
By holding the cutters the right way, you ensure that you don't damage the part. It leaves a small nub, but sanding it off is less work than fixing the damage caused by cutting too close.
As for your fingernail cutters, there's nothing wrong with using them. Just try to cut so that they leave a small nub of sprue on the part. The only real problem with them is that the shape often makes it difficult to reach in where you want to cut.
Reply to
Wayne C. Morris
Interesting. I've given up on using side cutters for parts that are connected to the sprue at more than one point, because cutting one connection would invariably warp the part and/or the entire tree (the cutter forces the plastic apart). Now I mostly use a saw, and relegate the cutters to connections that won't stress the part. But the saw is a lot more work. Maybe I'll give the cutters one more try...
Reply to
Harro de Jong
I use the flat side of Xuron, too. I just thought that was the logical thing to do. Excu-u-u-u-u-s-s-s-e me! :) Jerry 47
Reply to
jerry 47
In article , "Wayne C. Morris" wrote:
Usually, stress issues arising out of multi-point attachment of parts can be finessed by first cutting the sprue frame that would allow the stresses to be transmitted. In other words, cut through the transverse sprue that is between the connection points--the side cutter will do fine. Thereafter, cutting the parts from the sprue is less likely to transmit significant stress even though still nominally attached in two (or more) places.
Mark Schynert
Reply to
Mark Schynert
I've used simple hardware store flat cutters for decades.
One thing that I found out the hard way, though. Don't try to cut wire or cable with them. The edges tend to be "soft". Cutting some of the harder wire, etc. can leave nasty dents, rendering the cutters useless.
Tom
Reply to
Maiesm72
And snipped-for-privacy@zzzzonnet.nl.invalid (Harro de Jong) opened up and revealed to the world news:1gfqzbz.z0uce51y8lz6aN% snipped-for-privacy@zzzzonnet.nl.invalid:
Chad,
I too use a razor saw to cut through the hevier sprues, for the "lighter" sprues I use an Xacto knife. The blade depends on the thickness of the sprue that I'm cutting.
Digital_Cowboy
- -- Live Long and Prosper . + . + . . .. .. . ______________________. . . . __ . \_______NCC_1701______|) .______.---'--'---.________ || || /-------.__________.-------/ /============/___/ '--' . \==\_____________|(- + . . + . . . . . + + .. . + . . + . . . . . . . + . .
Reply to
Digital_Cowboy
stress the part. But the saw is a lot more work. Maybe I'll give the cutters one more try...>>
One of the guys in the club found a set of "fingertip saws" that were pretty handy. They're about the same shape as a guitar pick, but a little smaller, and work very well. I can find out where he got them and post it.
Hey Osama, check your six
Reply to
Grinch
I've just recently started using side cutters. I use them like the picture on the left (the wrong way) for single attached items. I can see why the method on the right is correct, less stress transferred to the part. What I usually use is a pair of bird claw scissors which trap the part and shear it cleanly. There's still a small nub to clean but you don't need three hands to excise a tricky part. hth
The Keeper (of too much crap)
Reply to
Keeper
It depends on how the jaws of the side cutters are ground. When cutting something most cutters will kick the part out of one side and hold the other. Usually one side will also leave a cleaner cut than the other. It's good to experiment with some scrap sprues to see which side of your cutter leaves a cleaner edge.
Reply to
Jim K

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