Why was this Tamiya vehicle built with a metal chassis?

This small little Japanese light vehicle - no idea why it has a heavy metal chassis. Seems like massive overkill
Nothing else I can find in the Tamiya line of kits has this.

Wassup?
http://www.squadron.com/ItemDetails.asp?item=TM35275
Craig
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On Tue, 28 Jun 2011 18:06:48 -0700, Musicman59 wrote:

They like multimedia kits? There might be technical reasons, but those aren't the only possible reasons for decisions like this.
Rob
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Musicman59 wrote:

Some of the tamiya kits are used in rc racing and other applications like rock crawlers so there might have been some cross over in the design. You build a library of cad drawing and often the design starts there. I do 3d prototype printing it is often a family of parts from the same tree.
Anybody build formula car models?
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down_hill wrote:

...I seem to be collecting them, at least. I built quite a few 1/12 Tamiya F-1 kits as a teen and am in the process of gathering replacements. I like the 1/20th ones as well.
Talk about dropping some bux on a built though...that aftermarket is high-$-end!
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Many of Tamiya's 1/48 line of kits have die cast chassis. From what I recall reading in articles ... People who buy the prebuilt kits like the heft. Where-as people who like to build the kits dislike them since they make it harder to add detail.
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They do it with some of their 1:48th scale armour too - even the Marder III which hasn't got a cast chassis has metal weights to be fitted inside the vehicle. Given the tracks are injection-moulded link-and-length, it can't be to improve the "sit" of the vehicle. Japanese 1:700th ship kits also feature metal ballast in waterline kits... Beats me why - perhaps it makes them less likely to be shaken off the shelf in earthquakes?
Cheers,
Moramarth
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Big deal in Japan is putting models in water with an aftermarket propellor that sits underneath with a suction cup. Same with some armor, put a motor in it and play on the freeway and avoid the trucks...
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Probably to give it some "heft" -- small vehicles tend to be super- light and easily damaged even when on a base as they have little to hold them in place. I also suspect not as many modelers as one would think use bases (I don't as I don't have the room for them).
Cookie Sewell
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