ww 1 in color

on the history channel today.
one hour is all aircraft, i dvr'd it for future paint
reference.
ain't this technology stuff cool?
Reply to
e
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Yeah e...its cool but some of them colors aien't The tires on most of those a/c weren't black but pink or grey. Black rubber didn't come along till way after the war was over. Its a long story but believe me its true. Mike IPMS
Reply to
Mike Keown
Be careful how much credence you give to the colors that you saw on that show. Those films were digitally colorized and I'm not at all sure that the person working the computer was as aware of the proper colors as he or she might have been.
I didn't see the whole show, but there were some aerial scenes that came from a movie made in the twenties - in black and white - but such things as flames from burning planes were painted in with translucent paint right on the print. Hardly an accurate color rendition.
Andy
Reply to
Andyroo111
actually i did know that from some research on thomas alva and his research into synthetics. there were some grays on the show.
Reply to
e
actually some of those were original color. there were at least 6-7 different color processes at thge time, some better than others. the show was billed as "actual color archives"
Reply to
e
"Andyroo111" wrote
There is a recent WW I book on the shelves that includes about 20 color photos taken by a French photographer. I almost bought it just for them.
My friend used to say he could almost relate to WW II in the Pacific because there were color photos, but before that - the Blitzkrieg, the Depression, WW I, Civil War - it might as well have been 1812 or 1776 or 1492 because it all looked the same.
KL
Reply to
Kurt Laughlin
not to many 1492 photos. (g)
Reply to
e
There are few genuine color photos of Australian planes in the Middle East from 1918--great one of an SE-5. These are real, and look a little "washed", like old National Geographic prints from the 20's--they may have used the same process.
Reply to
Tom Cervo
I missed that part. I hope they didn't mean the whole show as a lot of the clips I've seen previously in b&w. Anyone know who gets credit (and date) for the first color film? Or was it like airplanes and cars; people all developing similar things concurrently?
When colorizing was first coming into vogue the idea was that the program would make all the colors correct once you gave the proper value for one color. I thought that would be great for lozenge camo but apparently it wasn't true; too many vagaries in the program.
apprentice Farbton Polizei The Keeper (of too much crap!)
Reply to
Keeper
From a book I was just reading on the history of cartoons, it was a series of closer and closer approaches. Early Technicolor -and competing Cinecolor- for example, used combinations of two different colors, red and green or red and blue. When Technicolor solved the technical problems in combining three colors (red green and blue), Walt Disney got them to agree to a three-year exclusive license to him for cartoons, part of his march to dominance.
Reply to
Jack Bohn

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