Luney-Tunes on comp.cad.solidworks ...

Forgive me for this story, but it came to me as I was falling asleep, keeping me awake as I laughed at the storyline. Some names were
changed to protect, well at least one of the good folks here.
The opening scene; A coyote (John B.) sitting on a small bolder in the middle of the desert in deep thought, not noticing any around him. A road was just a few feet away with absolutely no traffic. Behind the coyote (John B.) is a multi-axis automated milling machine on a skid that had allowed it to be dragged around, very slowly. The machine was in terrible shape and looked as if a mad machinists had done a few modifications to it along with a few smoke checks. What once was a three and one-half axis mill is now a two and seven-sixteenths, more or less.
Into the scene at the horizon entered the road runner (Tom B.), zooming down the road toward the coyote (John B.), a cloud of dust trailing behind him.
The road runner (Tom B) was skirting down the road banking right and left to keep itself on the road. As it was going to pass by the coyote (John B.) it stopped let out its famous tongue wiggle and sounded off, “BEEP, BEEP”, and took off again.
This of course startled the coyote (John B.) and made him fall of his bolder backwards. As he crept up and peered over the back side of the bolder to see what caused this item, a thought came to him. “The road runner (Tom B) … I will destroy him for I am a SUPER GENIUS”, he stated aloud. “I will use my mill to make a weapon to use against this road runner (Tom B)”.
The coyote (John B.) turned around to look at the milling machine, the smell of burning wires still hanging around the equipment. “I will need to connect my machine to power,” he spouted. But where he was at this moment the only available power that he could see was the high power lines that go to Phoenix. “That should do,” he said, “but I will need some wire.”
Off in the distance the coyote (John B.) saw smaller wires that traveled down to a smaller pole that passed from pole to pole off to the horizon. “That will do!”, he stated. Now the road runner (Tom B) had stopped a good distance away on a bluff to watch what the coyote (John B.) was going to do. There was not too much going on in this neck of the desert so any entertainment was worth watching. He sat down keeping his focus on the coyote (John B.).
Meanwhile the coyote (John B.) had traversed the desert over to the smaller power poles. There was another winding road that paralleled the poles, of course. The coyote (John B.) stood there scratching his head, looking up trying to figure out how he was going to remove the wires for his alternate purpose.
Now the road runner (Tom B) thought that it should try to help the poor coyote (John B.) so he shot off quickly to get down the road to him. The road runner (Tom B) could not saw anything but his famous “BEEP, BEEP”. But his thoughts were to try to help this poor creature. He zoomed up to the coyote (John B.), stopped abruptly and did the tongue wiggle and sounded off, “BEEP, BEEP.”
Of course the coyote (John B.) was too involved to notice until the noise came. He jumped at the sound. Not a little jump but a major jump that took him up to the power lines. Instinctively the coyote (John B.) grabbed for the wires reaching two of them, one in each hand.
The road runner (Tom B) was still standing there and saw the most amazing flash of light and heard the load POP from where the coyote (John B.) was hanging from the power lines. A cloud of smoke expanded away from the coyote (John B.) as he got smoked checked. The coyote (John B.) released the power lines and fell to the ground. But just as he was about to reach the ground again the road runner (Tom B) shot off back to his bluff to continue watching. The road runner (Tom B) felt good that he had helped.
The coyote (John B.) meanwhile had hit the ground, smoking and sparking still from the contact with the electricity. A short second later one of the power lines broke loose and drifted down to land on the coyote (John B.). This set off a second flash of electricity onto the coyote (John B.), in turn disconnecting the wire from a distant pole.
Now the coyote (John B.) righted himself and sat up. He looked down and saw the wire in his lap. He grabbed it, raised it above his head and said, “Now I got you road runner (Tom B) . You cannot stop a SUPER GENIUS.” The road runner (Tom B) sat and watched as the coyote (John B.) coiled up the burned, but still seemingly good wire and continue back to his milling machine.
The coyote (John B.), still smirking with knowledge that he will destroy the road runner (Tom B) , connected the wire to the main power of the mill. He then sat down and drew in the sandy soil his plan to get the wires up to the high power pole. He did not want to get another shock from the electricity so he planned to throw the wire up to lasso the insulator in the closest pole and let go before the electricity engaged.
Now the road runner (Tom B) was contemplating assisting the coyote (John B.) again. He knew that you should never connect a machine without the usage of a circuit breaker or some kind of fuse in-line with the power. This was almost like the time he watched the coyote (John B.) try to run a machining job without verifying that he had sufficient lubrication oil pressure. But since he felt that there was tension between the coyote (John B.) and himself at the moment he just decided to watch … this time.
The coyote (John B.) finishing his lasso plans slapped his hands together and rubbed them around, knowing that his SUPER GENIUS had come up with an excellent plan to rid himself of this vial road runner (Tom B) .
The rest of the show was watched by the road runner (Tom B) alone. He could see the coyote (John B.) tying the wire so he could get a loop in it. he proceeded to twirl the wire until he got a great loop in it hovering just over his head. The coyote (John B.) got it twirling faster and faster until he let the wire fly. He jumped back and landed right up against the side of the milling machine.
At this moment the wire made contact with the insulator and the high power line. And this allowed high voltage electricity flow from the power line to his machine that typically only used four hundred eighty volts maximum. Unfortunately this high voltage power line was a little higher than that, much more in fact.
The next scene was spectacular. The flash of light was incredible as the road runner (Tom B) had to turn his eyes away from the brightness. It was almost as if someone had set off a bomb in front of him. A small mushroom cloud rose from the desert floor where the milling machine stood.
After the smoke cleared you could see the coyote (John B.), smoldering from the explosion looking over at his milling machine for damage. “I may have lost another axis here, but I can still machine parts on it,” he stated.
With a raised hand in the air he stated, “I’ll get you next time road runner (Tom B) as I am still a SUPER GENIUS”.
The road runner (Tom B) happy with his entertainment, zoomed off into the distance, knowing that he did try to help …
More to come … iQ
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Many of the lies have been clearly shown.

For you to get a clue? No one has that long.
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On Aug 5, 10:37 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

was right, again.

What recent experience do you have? Be specific.
I don't see much in the past, either other than you made parts for Raytheon.
I did see pictures you posted of your clapped-out vises in the back of some beat up pickup truck.
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