mating planes

Someone help me plese. Excuse my Englis.
I am treying to learn Solidworks planes, not eazy. Will someone plese
explain to me what means to mate two planes together and why is this
needed first of all. I no about drawing on planes and what this meens,
but not why to mate two planes for the reeson.
I am sorry about my languge skils. There is no grouops in my country
to help. Plese help me if you can.
Marcos Fontopolous
Reply to
Marcos
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I have never mated two plates together, as I didn't think about trying it, since I would just rather use one plane rather than two mated together (if possible).
Mostly I make one plane offset a specific distance from another plane, and that is what I have seen most often in other user's models.
Bo
Marcos wrote:
Reply to
Bo
where have you come across the 'mate two planes together'? in the help notes?
Reply to
neil
It sounds like you first need to learn the difference between parts, drawings, and assemblies.
Marcos wrote:
Reply to
That70sTick
My partner in crime was told to mate the two planes together, two parts in an assembly, by our VAR. It caused huge problems, so the quick answer is don't EVER mate two planes together ever!
Reply to
pete
Other than general library components (screws, bushings, etc.), all of my custom parts are mated in assemblies via the default planes. Super robust! Never had any problems. These planes never change.
This works for my industry anyway, but may not in others. So, never say never.....
Reply to
Seth Renigar
Generally, my experience is that if you can use the planes for mating, life is better. As a general rule, I build symmetry into my parts such that the system planes mean something and are usable. You may not end up using a particular plane, but you would be surprised how often I see someone start a rectangular sketch in the corner, and then come back later and put in 2 extra planes at the midpoints of the edges. :-{
So, I think the answer you are looking for is that you can, and should, for the most part, mate two planes together when trying to position parts in an assy.
WT
Reply to
Wayne Tiffany
When dealing with mates, you should think of planes as just another item that can be referenced. Just like flat surfaces, planes are "planar" and can be used accordingly. Depending upon your design task, mating with planes may be more convenient than other types of mates. Its important to remember that SolidWorks offers many different options for accomplishing the same task. This gives the designer multiple choices and more flexibility.
I should note that planes can be mated to things other than planes. For example, a plane can be mated to a flat face, en edge, or a point, using any appropriate type of mate (such as coincident, parallel, perpendicular, distance, angle).
I would encourage you to experiment with different types of mates until you become more comfortable with the many options they provide. If you don't know where to start, look at assemblies developed by other people and carefully examine the mates. You might be able to locate a book that explains this in detail, but I am not familiar with the available SolidWorks books.
Reply to
John Eric Voltin
I would caution people on making such generalizations based upon single events. It would be much more useful to evaluate the situation and determine the source of the problems. In fact, you should send the assembly to your VAR and ask them to analyze the situation.
Its quite possible that the source of the problem is not the mate between two planes, but the interaction between that mate and in conext features, other mates, dependencies, etc.
Reply to
John Eric Voltin
Thanks for the replies, The assembly was sent to our VAR who also forwarded to SW and both came to the same conclusion on "our" particular assembly that "plane mates" were the cause of the errors. So we now work with no plane mates.
Each man, woman or child to his own, lol
Reply to
pete
That's quite surprising. Thanks for the information.
Reply to
John Eric Voltin

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