SolidWorks Sucks...



Sounds more like competitor VARs trying to start stuff.......maybe they are in a head to head with solidworks at some company and are about to lose the sale. Post some negative stuff here and then point to it.
As for cross hatch...select it...then select "None" in the property manager.
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The 2005 version can't even do a cross section

If you're going to slam SW, come up w/ something more credible. There are multiple ways to turn off or hide hatching.
I've gotten plenty of "actual work" done with SW. I've also done plenty with Pro/E and UG. You don't make a convincing case that SW is the source of your problem.
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lol... I knew a topic like that would start Great conversations. Thruth is I'm no salesman trying to bash SW. I'm just a poor old Pre- Cad Tech user that converted to SW a year ago. I totally agree with Devlin's comment of the slow (parts/assemblies' drawings). Has for the hatching... Selecting none in the property manager doesn't do a thing (at least not with the 2006 SP2.1version). I don't think I need to get all techinical to say that SW suck's the work I do is mostly very basic stuff. Parts, assm, dwgs... But if the program can't even select a line to put a dimension on without giving me a fuss... Not that's not very efficient is it?
Still wouln'd buy a Kia...
Cheers!
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J00 Sux0rS
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On Apr 4, 4:30 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

"Slow" is a relative term, and I've been designing parts for over 30 years, over 20 on CAD. The 68040 Macs may have been slow, but I got good 2D work done on them in the late 80s. It was a good tool for my jobs. I've done assemblies with 5-6 dozen parts where every part is rounded-conical and assemblies start to slow down, but SWks is good for the job, and that is on a 1.7Ghz M60 laptop or my MacBook Pro.
I've never had to use techniques with SWks to allow me to work with larger assemblies, but I know I've listened to more experienced SWks users discuss it on this Newsgroup as to techniques to make it work better, and some users here have put up papers on working with large assemblies. Still, if I got boxed down on speed, I'ld upgrade hardware quickly (the new Intel processors are almost here). Hardware includes the PC its accessories (& crapware in the OS that must be removed or zapped), the network, the server, and its software.
If Swks would not cut it for large assemblies with good hardware and best large assembly techniques, I would simply pick a better tool, pay for it and learn it. CAD programs are just another tool. I wouldn't pick a Bridgeport mill to make an injection mold cavity in this day and age, and I wouldn't pick a knee mill with a CNC add-on to do hard SS milling, as it is the wrong tool for the job.
"Fuss" is sort of relative, too. I've never had trouble dimensioning my simpler parts either in the solids or in drawings, & frankly don't remember hearing about not being able to select a line to dimension on this group, but I could have just passed it by. I assume that if there is a situation about dimensioning a line that is common, various people reported it and others are working on fixing it. What type of line gives a "Fuss"?
So let's look at these nebulous terms "slow" and "fuss" and see what options exist to deal with them. There may be some answers hereabouts.
Bo
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It's not quite as simple as that. The reasons why SW is as popular as it is are for the very reasons that John H has said. I saw it first hand working for a VAR. Many people hadn't heard of anything except SW and in fact many people honestly think that SW is the only 3d mech package around. Then you show them a fancy pre-canned carefully crafted demo and they're blown away. Demos that include garbage like autoballooning and autodimension etc. etc. that NEVER work in the real world.
So here I am, an experienced mechanical designer that is looking for work. Which software package do I need to know to be employable? Whichever is popular, not which is best.
Fortunately I'm working with a group of design consultants now that are working directly for manufacturers and we're in a position to choose whichever CAD package we need. Right now we're seriously looking at ProE because there are people around here that know it. In my neck of the woods it's all SW, ProE and Inventor.
While I'm continuing to rant I'll share another reason I'm PO'd at SW. At this very moment I'm trying to hide certain edges in a drawing. SW places edges over top of edges (big no-no in ACAD). When I select an edge it invariably hides the entire edge if you know what I mean and the screws up the drawing. Quite literally my very next move is the undo button which does NOTHING. Then I try to select the edge to show the edge and this fails too. Now I'm stuck with a screwed up section view. This very problem has persisted in SW since the day I started with it.
Thankfully SW now allows you to add a fancy diamond plate skin to the feature manager because I really need that.
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Apart from well desrved rants about how Undo is next to useless...
Do you get better edge selection when you hold the shift key?
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That helps with selection but not always. The bigger frustation is the inability to change the thickness and/or hide/show etc. The hide/show problem has been around FOREVER.
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good ol' bob z. ran into the inability to dimension a line about a week or so ago. it was the most frustrating thing for him at the time because it needed to be done and done right now. ya know? one of those pressure cooker scenarios. the line was just a line on the bottom of a plate. nothing special about it at all. bob z. is used to having a bit of an issue picking the edge of a circle, but this was a flat plate.
bob z. doesn't complain about speed. bob z. just finished a part that had 10,668 holes. now, that was a resource hog!!! it would've been cool if it had been a flat part, but it was a bell shaped detail, so each row of holes had to be it's own feature. (can't get into much more specifics, non-disclosure...)
other than that, swx rawks hard. it is just the little things, ya know? the little things. :~)>
bob z. is discussing this post with a co-worker right now. he does the big stuff - he has an assembly right now with over 8000 parts. oh yes.
bob z. p.s. kill the king. the king is dead. long-live the king.
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Thanks for your feedback guys. Now that I have your attention ; ) Here's the whole story...
(Posted by Andr.)
Here's my situation:
We design and build Kiosks. Our sales department designs "dummy" models in solidworks and then exports it to get rendered for the client to approve, and that usually works out fine. The models are fully solid, only surface details, etc.
When it comes to actually building the unit though, we've been unsure how to proceed. The shop used to use Autocad and it would take a week to update any kind of details for the shop drawings. About a year ago, they decided to "get with the times" and get a solid modeller. Solidworks (basic version) was what was chosen at the time (pro-e is still a little pricey, and the designer had bad experiences with Inventor). Having a solid model driving the drawings would make updating a breeze, or so we thought.
When it comes time to actually model a unit though, it seems to be more complicated than we anticipated. They are made of wood primarily (plywood, etc), with metal accessories (handles, slides, hinges, etc). Our first project was done as an assembly, with each panel of wood a seperate part, but the assembly started to get overly complicated REALLY quickly. Our project folders were immense, for what seemed like a simple product. For our drawings, we typically have to show a fully assemebled unit, cross sections, indicating the panel ID's to reference a cut-list. Sometimes drawer front or something would be shown individually. As an assembly, it wasn't too hard to put together the required assemblies to insert into our drawing package, but the actual design time was much longer than intended.
We then tried doing a welded assembly. This greatly sped up design time, not having to name each part individually, deal with mates, etc. We could model a whole unit in a day or two. But then came the tricky part: doing the drawings. Cross sections were 'ok' (semmed a little slow to work with though). But when it came time to show only a few of the solid bodies as a seperate "assembly" in the drawing package, were we unsure of the best way to seperate that from the original welded assembly. We originally selected the individual bodies, then selected 'insert into new part', and while thats fine as-is, we often found ourselves wanting to add or remove a body from that 'export' we just did, so as to still stay parametric to the original welded assembly, but we couldn';t accomplish this without deleting it and basiacally starting over; losing all the work we had done in the drawing. We also considered configurations, but that ended up being terribly slow, seeming like it loaded thw whole assembly each time we wanted to do a view, and it ended up taking 30+ seconds to switch pages in our drawing package.
Basically we're at a loss, everything seems too slow and clunky to work like we would want to. Our computers are by no means slow, 2 gigs of ram, dual core intel bla bla..
Does anyone else have experience building and detailing assemblies of this sort? what would you suggest? How would you go about building it from the ground up? welded assembly? plain old assembly modeling? configurations? etc? Anything suggestion that could help speed this process up would help, and our VAR doesn't seem to be much help. If you work with large assemblies, what tricks do you use to keep your software running smoothly? opening a drawing package right now takes ages, let along switching pages, it's getting quite irritating.
I had previously used solidworks in a machine shop for years and had honestly no complaints, since i really wasn't working with large assemblies, i was mostly dealing with sometimes complex, single models to be machined on CNC, quite a different world i tell ya!
Thanks!
Andr Richard The idiot that suggested Solidworks.
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On Apr 4, 7:56 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I know there are a number of users who do large assemblies who will answer questions in this group, and some of them are consultants who help with planning implementation of SolidWorks and training, and one of those may be a great help if you were to find a CSWP consultant near you.
I remember discussions on this group of large assembly techniques, lightweight parts, just suppressing certain parts or subassemblies, using design tables to drive a family of similar products & configurations in both parts and assemblies, limiting rebuilds and more. You can use those key words to quickly search out some of those techniques discussed in the past. I think these will get you some help.
Bo
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Seems to me some user group experience might help. It might also help to have a seasoned user come in and review "how" you are trying to do what you are doing. With SW there is usually an easy way and a hard way. Many times the old ways are the hard ways as they come with a bunch of hidden assumptions that don't apply to solid modeling. However, even with all that SW can be slow as it really should let you do it your way and still perform well.
TOP
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Geeeezzzzz you guys are to much! Take away the cad system (any one) and replace it with a pencil/eraser and drafting table. Then tell me how much it sucks.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Oh, how I miss the days of the drafting board. No file management, just throw it in a drawer. The smell of ammonia from the blue print machine. Electric erasers on Sepia copies. I'd go back in a heart beat.

wrote:
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I think the MOST missed thing here was the fact he is using 2006 sp2.1 !!!!
That was a crap service pack and was slow as a dead snail.
Update to 2006 sp5.0, you will see a massive improvement and it seems to be rock steady, (for me, anyway)
One thing I do have a gripe about, are hole patterns, these really slow things down.
A good way to speed up designing, is to put commonly unchanged parts and assemblies, into the design library folders.
Here another reason for slowness that is quite often overlooked.
example Main assembly sub assembly a part a part a1
sub assembly b part b part b1
Open and change "part b" from the main assembly
If you do not open and re-save "part b", drawing for "part b", "sub assembly b", drawing for "sub assembly b" and finally re-open and save the main assembly and the drawing for the main assembly, this will slow everything down.
You can see this, when you go to check in the main assembly drawing, into Pdmworks or similar package.
The drawings will be opened and then saved, BEFORE, they will check-in.
Pete

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On Apr 3, 4:25 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Thanks for the advice Pete!
I just installed 2007 SP0. I got to say It's still pretty slow, for the drawing part of it. I still can't get rid of the hatching either. I mean a simple cross section. The tools option is set at none and the auto hatching in the section view is checked of as well. I do not want to right click all the hatching individually and turn it off, which takes 51 seconds to do (yes I counted). Does anyone else has the same problem?
Cheers!
MDesign
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Why do all machine design guys think they are the center of the world, concerning their work with 3D CAD software? Of cause the amount of users of the nuts an bolts fraction are considerable, but they are definitely no measure for the requirements of a sophisticated and powerful cad software. Their only problem seems to be the amount of parts the software is still able to handle and to flatten 3d data again to 2d paper drawings with millions of crossing lines. ;-)
LOL 10.000 +++ parts consisting of piled up boxes and cylinders, only crude geometry. Thats nothinyou need a cad software, you just need to take some nice coloured wooden building blocks ;-)
I bet that I can also force down the performance of SW with only one single complex part of a consumer good, designed for injection molding.
And thats real frustrating to me to see that SW still cant handle complex geometry, surface-tangencies and precise predictable spline behavior in an acceptable and efficient way.
Not to mention all further shortcomings of SW: bug legacies reaching back to 2001+, painful instalation, the lack of stability, altered geoetry, redundant gadgets, decreasing quality while price is steadily increasing ....
just my 2cents of a non machine design guy
happy flaming ;-)
JoJo
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JoJo,
Guess you never tried a machined project for real men like say an eight cyllinder internal combustion engine. With all the castings and forgings you have the worst of both worlds, complex geometry, drafts and fillets galore and lots of parts. Isn't just the ID guys that do complex.
TOP
PS You haven't lived till you've done a watercooled cylinder head casting.
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Any chance you could provide such a thing as another modeling challenge? It would be an interesting part, and probably the subject of a lot of fruitful discussion. I'm not sure how to specify what we would all be working towards in such a way as to isolate modeling issues from casting design issues. Perhaps a drawing of a crude prismatic finished part to be made into a realistic cast part? Specifying draft angles, corner radii and parting line should nail it down pretty well. Perhaps it would have to be a series of challenges.
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