Any clever tricks for straightening flex track?

I'm in the process of laying a lot of track using Micro Engineering flex track (Illinois Central's Markham Yard (!)). As you know, this flex track
has a fair amount of "memory". That is, when bent to a certain shape, it tends to hold that shape.
Anyone who has used this stuff knows that, even when you first untape a fresh bundle, the individual pieces of track are rarely perfectly straight. To get them straight, I've needed to spend a fair amount of time tweaking, bending, sighting with one eye down the length, tweaking again, etc.
Has anyone come up with a clever way to get these pieces straight with somewhat less effort?
Regards,
    Vince
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I have rapped them gently along a table to straighten them out. (Shinohara HO flex.) Should work for all.
Or you could line them up between two straight edges.
Vince Guarna wrote:

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Many moons ago I found a 12 inch long (real world measurement) commercially sold tool that was a flat strip of aluminum, fit exactly the inside space between a set of HO gauge ME rails and was just the right height / thickness that it matched Code 70 rail. Using that was an easy way to get the rails straight in 12 inch long segments. This worked / works well on the layout for doing straightening segments of flex track as you go.
I liked it so much that I persuaded a machinist friend to make me another one, a yard long. I use that to "pre straighten" the flex track before it goes on the benchwork for track laying.
Your mileage may vary.
-- Jim McLaughlin
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straight.
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I use the HO gauge track alignment tool by Ribbonrail on the Micro Engineering flex track.
On the Walthers web site: http://www.walthers.com/exec/page/manuinfo/v170
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Thats it! Ribbonrail makes a foot long version of a flex track straightener. thats what I had. I had a machinist friend make me a 3 foot version.
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Jim McLaughlin

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I don't know how well it works; I'm told to mail it to yourself shaped like a bow and the P.O. will straighten it out when they deliver it......(VBG) I think the best is to use 2 long straight edges and numerous tacks or nails. Happy Hollidays! Paul in Fl

straight.
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Hey, watch it! You don't know what we go through. Five times the normal mail volume, short-term temps, everybody's grumpy, no place to put the extra stuff.
Just for that, I'm gonna make sure we DON'T straighten yours. So there! <VBG>
Jay P.O. employee Oak Creek, WI Priority Annex
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Salv
diskussionsgruppsmeddelandet:Xns95C965B8AC9B4vinceguarnacomcastne@216.196.97 .136...

straight.
Dear Vince, In most British railway modelling magasines a device known as a setrack is sold these come in N and HO gauges and are to various radii as well as straight sections , you place it between the rails and pin down and you get the absolutely straight section you wanted without any hassle , the same for various curves :) Useful bit of kit I think. Beowulf
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