Any Other Secret Thomas the Tank Engine Fans?



When I was making my living driving trains I had to endure sessions in a real train SIM. It was supposed to be a railroad equivalent to a flight simulator like the ones used for pilot training. A profile of the appropriate division was loaded into the thing and the subject sat inside in a replica of a typical EMD control cab. 1: It was even more boring than driving a real train. 2: It did not emulate real life train handling worth a damn.
I can count on my fingers the number of knuckles I broke, and have some left over. I could rarely move a SIM train across the division on the SIM without breaking several - until I learned how to drive the SIM. The SIM was totally different in most respects, because it was programmed by someone who had not a clue about how to really drive a real train. What a joke and waste of money that thing was.
Froggy,
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I imagine it's something like inviting visitors out to the shop to see your latest nicely machined project, and finding they're most impressed by all the nice curly chips under the lathe.
--
Bill Kaiser
snipped-for-privacy@mtholyoke.edu
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Those nice curly chips tell me a lot about how good a machinist you are...
<<grin>>
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How many home machinist use carbide tooling, my guess most modelers shops use HSS. Roger Aultman
Joe Ellis wrote:

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Me, me! HSS is good for 95% of the jobs in a hobby application, but there is no sustitute for TiN, cobalt, or carbide tools for some jobs. Milling and drilling glass circuit board material for one. Tungsten carbide renders a better finish on copper too. Copper is a particular bitch to machine because it is so "sticky". Ditto some plastics and several aluminum alloys, 3003 for one.
Froggy,
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Froggy wrote:

Not sure that hobby machines have the power or rigidity to use carbide tooling for what they are good at. Perhaps the 1/4" tools with the piece of carbide attached are usefull for some special jobs. Roger Aultmanm
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wrote:
Roger,

I got some tooling using the small lozenge shaped tips a year or two ago to try them out and see how I got on. My lathe is a UK 3.25" swing (6.5" in US terms) with a 1/4 horse motor and it has no trouble working with the tools. I now tend to use them for almost everything and only drop back to HSS or carbon steel when that is the better option. The only problem with these small inserts is that they are prone to chipping with interrupted cuts, so machining irregular shapes is the time when the other tools come out.
Jim.
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wrote:
>>> Froggy

Roger

Depends on what you call a hobby machine. Mine is not used to make a living, so it is definitely a hobby machine. I mostly make small stuff ( less than 1/2"/12mm diameter ) on my 12" x 36", 2kW motor lathe and usually use HSS. Anything over 19mm diameter I use carbide. Current project is trying to make (good, small) brass uni joints - the first ones were u/s, improving with practice. Ultimate objective is a Shay in Sn3.5 Was making serious chips yesterday (for lathe size) for a 6" dia tractor implement part, they were blue, about 2mm thick and the lathe was protesting!
Alan in beautiful Golden Bay, Western Oz, South 32.25.42, East 115.45.44 GMT+8 VK6 YAB ICQ 6581610 to reply, change oz to au in address
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snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com, In a message on 30 Nov 2005 18:07:27 -0800, wrote :
c> I have to admit that I'm watching this show regularly, at age 42. c> Don't know about you, but any rail image halts my flipping through the c> channels, so the first time it was a reflex. However, I was so c> impressed with the scenery and the quality of the setting, I got c> hooked. There are some very skilled modelers building the sets. c> c> Does anyone know what scale is used for the TV show? I've been trying c> to puzzle it out from the details of the scenery, but haven't figured c> it out.
I suspect they use several *different* scales, which is 'typical' for TV/Movie production.
c> c> So yes, I'm a secret Thomas watcher. Plus, it helps me remember to c> always tell the truth, be kind to my friends, and be really useful by c> not causing confusion and delay in my workplace. Ahem. c> c> Is it just me? c> c> Chris c> Kansas City c> c>
\/ Robert Heller ||InterNet: snipped-for-privacy@deepsoft.com http://www.deepsoft.com/ ||FidoNet: 1:321/153 http://www.deepsoft.com/~heller /\
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That sounds right... didn't Model Railroader cover this subject a few years ago?
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Mark Mathu spake thus:

Yes; as I pointed out in another posting in this thread, _MR_ did an article on Thomas in April 1993. And no, they don't use different scales: it's all O scale (Mrklin, custom-built).
--
The French Revolutionary Calendar (in use 1793-1806):

* Vendmiaire (from Latin vindemia "vintage") Starting Sept 22, 23 or 24
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On Sat, 03 Dec 2005 18:08:05 GMT, David Nebenzahl

Unfortunately just because something is printed in MR doesn't make it correct. You are correct in that the MR article states that they used Maerklin's O scale locos. The author made a mistake, they are actaully No. 1 scale as is fairly obvious in the pictures with the article and as Greg already stated Maerklin do not make O scale, a fact you could easily check on line.
Keith
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

It is definitely NOT O gauge Maerklin. Your source is WRONG!

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snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com wrote:

I just love Thomas. And I love finding a small sprat that just loves Thomas, too.
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