Incline Risers

I'm looking at these Woodland Scenics Incline Risers:
http://www.hobbylinc.com/htm/woo/woost1411.htm
I'm a little confused at how they work, especially since the one
pictured looks pretty straight across. It says you get four in a pack. Does the first one start at 0" and by the time you get to the fourth one the height is four inches? Or are all the pieces the same and you have to adjust the height yourself somehow, like cutting from the bottom or adding shims?
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you are correct.. the 4 pieces total are a 4" rise out of the box.. the first 1 starts out at 0, and the last is 4".
The picture on the website has it laying on its side.
iarwain snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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Oh, okay, thanks a lot. I'll be getting me some of these, they look pretty handy for the price. I'm going to be working on a foam layout (I think) as opposed to all plywood like I have in the past, and I think this will be a nice change.
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Look at my web site below for pictures of my layout in progress. Some of them show risers in place.
The inclines comes in three sizes: 2, 3, 4nad 4 percent. Each set had a different number of risers: each raise the elevation by about 4" (4.5 for the 3%) using 4, 6, and 8 sections respectively. See the Woodland Scenics site here:
http://www.woodlandscenics.com /
For pictures and descriptions of the sets.
My experience with the whole foam riser and incline was generally good with the following issues:
1. Make sure that the risers/inclines are EXACTLY the same height at the junction. These are mass produced items and the tolerances will allow up to 1/8" difference if the two worst cases are butted against another. You can't fix those differences with plaster or roadbed, you need to adjust the risers if you want smooth, level track.
2. I tried the WS suggestions of putting plaster cloth over the risers / inclines the applying the roadbed. Because the risers are a zig-zag pattern with voids, the plaster cloth winds up bumpy: sinks into the void, rises over the solid parts. I got it smoother after finding this out, but doing it again, I'd put the road bed directly on the risers, then lay the plaster cloth up to the road bed, then ballast.
Ed
in article snipped-for-privacy@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com, iarwain snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com at iarwain snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote on 11/11/05 8:38 AM:

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Ed Oates
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Okay, I have another question then.
I like to use cork roadbed. Can you use cork roadbed on top of the incline risers? Usually I put a few track nails through the cork to hold it in place while the glue dries. It sounds like this wouldn't work with the foam risers (probably wouldn't hold the nails). I know I could probably just glue it down if it was in a straight run, but what about the curves?
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iarwain snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Use a water-based latex contact cement. If you use it wet, that allows some adjustment before it dries, and of course will take a while to dry. Use pins to hold the cork in place. I like those T-pins that quilters use, they come in several sizes and have lots of uses around a modelr railroad. Make sure the foam doesn't sag between supports.
HTH&GL
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