Layout Space

We need the space back that use to be the spare room. So my layout needs to
be out of the way when not in use. I have already taken part of the layout
away. It was a "L" shape and I have done away with the "L". I now have a
4'X10' layout. I thought about making it so it would lower and raise, but
there is to much weight. I am now considering making it like a Murphy be and
fold to the wall.
Has anyone out there done something like this? Does anyone have any other
ideas on how to do it?
Thanks in advance
Chris
Reply to
Chris
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If there is too much weight to raise to the ceiling, why would a Murphy work?
Reply to
Lobby Dosser
If it's L-shaped how about individual sections maybe 4' long, either hinged or better still free-standing modules on hinged legs.
That way the layout can be taken down and moved eg to a new house or a train show.
Reply to
Christopher A. Lee
Murphy springs and hinges are very strong and can more then handle the weight
Reply to
Chris
L is already gone. I do not want modules because I do not want to have to set them up all the time. Also would still have storage issues
Reply to
Chris
My first question would be "where else might you put it?" Do you have a loft? A garden with space for a shed? Rent a lock up garage? Join a club and move it there?
Reply to
Graham Harrison
Hi,
In order to be allowed a layout, I found the following solution: The layout consists of two parts, the rear is in a shelf unit and the front is hinged to fold down. It can even be separated at the hinges.
For an existing layout this may not be an option, though.
A fold-up solution might be possible. Kind of like fold-up beds? Though I guess you'd have to make two 4'x5' segments from it in order to handle them easily enough? Sounds possible ;-)
Ciao...
Reply to
Bernhard Agthe
"Chris" wrote in message...
I'd look to reevaluate your conclusion of "to much weight" to raise and lower. At 10' it seems likely to span or nearly span from wall to wall. Go into the attic (if you have one) and even if they are not now load bearing walls, you can make them load bearing by anchoring via shims and splints (glued and screwed) to wall top 2x4s. Place a board (2x6 or 2x8") crossways on top on the ceiling joists (to also spread weight via many joists) to anchor eye bolts through. With a double or even triple pulley system (for the 4 corners) you can lift a real serious load.
Good luck to you.
Reply to
a425couple
When I was a youngster, we did a 4x8 O gauge Lionel setup in my small bedroom. At one point, as I recall, we had a pulley system which allowed it to be raised to the ceiling or lowered to the floor (where there was scarcely room for the bed too). At another point in time it was hinged at the base of the wall and could be swung up when not it use. It was a real PITA playing with it on the floor. My suggestion would be the pulley system but when it's down, have legs attach - or have the legs attached to the bottom of the layout and swung up when it's raised. Just make sure you have everything bolted in securely - weight shouldn't be an issue unless it's very heavy - I store my motorcycle trailer above the car in the garage - on ropes and pulleys.
Reply to
ray
It's expensive and in the form offered here probably doesn't meet the requirement but how about a variation on this theme?
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Reply to
Graham Harrison
The wire and block and tackle to raise it to the ceiling could easily handle as much or more weight than a Murphy. Guy 30 or so years ago raised and lowered a double garage size layout from the ceiling.
Reply to
Lobby Dosser
That is neat. But like you stated very expensive.
Reply to
Chris

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