Make a Rail Cleaning Car

wrote:


You would need a working engine to move it about. The "powered" part refers to the rotating pad and the vacuum system. In fact, the Tomix car is the Atlas car without the Atlas label added to the box...
Franz T
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Franz T wrote:

Roco!
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wrote:

Nope, just looked at that car at an online dealer. The Tomix car (Model# TO-6421) and the Atlas car (Model# 32550/32551) are identical except for the paint job. Roco's N-scale cleaning car (Model# T15500) looks a bit like the one that Model Power sold at one time...
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Franz T wrote:

Ok, so Atlas is buying wider than just Roco these days.

Roco will sell to anyone!
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David Booth wrote:

DB:
You actually have a lot to choose from. You could have an early gas railcar such as the McKeen or Hall-Scott, or one of the larger railbuses used at that time. I lean toward the McKeen, which, if not exactly a huge success, was not extremely rare, and is very stylish in a Jules Verne way.
McKeen (blt 1905-1917 or so): http://www.shiawasseehistory.com/mckeen.html
You could use an electric MU car, especially in the unlikely event your model RR has an overhead or third rail. You could even use a steam railcar, a number of which were built in the late 1800s and early 1900s. I wish I knew more about these.
An early, apparently German steam railcar:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/71/NoELB_Steam_Railcar.jpg
(There are some pictures of similar cars built for a RR in Baltimore in THE LOCOMOTIVES THAT BALDWIN BUILT, as well as some later cars that looked like interurbans with an engine truck and a smokestack up front...the truck looked like the engine of a small 0-4-0. The book shows a picture of one steam car, crewed by five hatted and bearded gents, with the amusing caption "Betcha didn't know there were five Smith Brothers.")
Another idea is to build an inspection locomotive - a small, obsolete steam loco with a very large cab, sometimes extended and supported on a truck at its end. This should be easy to put the cleaning equipment into.
For Greg P: methylated spirits is called denatured alcohol in the US.
As far as the Masonite, I have heard of people also using blocks of Homasote stood on end, rubbing against the track, to clear dust. I have used balsa-wood end grain for this purpose, too, but not in a track-cleaning car; I used it as a substitute for the abrasive block when cleaning neglected track. It probably takes longer (alcohol helps) but isn't abrasive.
Cordially yours: Gerard P. President, a box of track and some grids.
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snipped-for-privacy@gannon.edu wrote:
> An early, apparently German steam railcar: >
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/71/NoELB_Steam_Railcar.jpg
Gerard, it's actually Austro-Hungarian - it's a Komarek "dampftriebwagen" built for the 760mm gauge Mariazellerbahn in 1903.
Cheers,
Mark.
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David Booth wrote:

The DRG had several railcars like the Trix/Minitrix VT858 only they were designed for parcels delivery "Schnellverkher Stueckgueter" (sp?) with two large sliding doors and several barred windows each side.
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snippety
BTW, since the Tomix car is not self powered, you would need something to tow it around - maybe as a baggage car hooked to a doodlebug or a piece of MOW equipment being towed around by a small steam engine?
Ed
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