Re: DCC systems that interface with a computer

Most all of the upper end ones can. NCE, Digtrax, Lenz!
Reply to
Jon Miller
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=>Are there any DCC control systems that can expand to interface with a =>homecomputer?
Reverse the question to:
What sort of interface do I need to connect my homecomputer to a DCC system?
and add:
What software is available?
Then do a google on "DCC home computer interface" or "DCC PC interface."
Have fun!
Wolf Kirchmeir ................................. If you didn't want to go to Chicago, why did you get on this train? (Garrison Keillor)
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
Don't forget Easy DCC
Larry Madson
Reply to
larry madson
And as long as we're mixing interfaces, there are usb to parallel cables/adapters. Quite necessary if you want good performance from a parallel printer under WinXP.
Val
Reply to
VManes
One of the major problems for interface developers (like John Jabour with his excellent LocoBuffer interface is that USB is much more difficult to setup for a small-scale developer, compared with serial.
Jeff Law New Zealand
Reply to
Jeff Law
"K> "K> "K> =>Yes, another mystery. Why, in this day of complete systems on a chip, "K> =>are the DCC vendors still in the RS-232 world. I would really like one "K> =>that uses USB. I am guessing the next computer I purchase won't even "K> =>have an RS-232 on it. "K> "K> You'll be wrong, I think :-). RS232 is an older standard than USB, is well "K> established , is used for many different interface applications, and it's "K> supported in BIOS. In the "real world", where reliability is essential to te "K> success of a business, RS232 is one of a very small handful of standard "K> interfaces. Also, it's more than fast enough for model railroad use. "K> "K> In actuality, RS232 more universal than the "Universal Serial Bus", which "K> exists in two different standards (with a third looming on the horizon), "K> requires drivers at the OS level instead of hardware, and which is, er, "K> rather flaky besides, especially when run by Windows. Until USB is supported "K> in BIOS (there's been some movement in that direction, thank goodness), it's "K> simply not "universal." It has its uses, but to judge from the plaintive "K> wails for help on various comp NGs that I monitor, it's a long way from the "K> simplicity of RS232, even with devices that are built specifically for it. "K> EG, many peole have found that the parallel port connection to the printer is "K> more reliable than the USB connection, not because of hardware issues, but "K> because of OS + driver issues. (I could deliver a rant here on the stupidity "K> of making the OS responsible for running any hardware at all, but I'll spare "K> you.)
Another thing about RS232 (and the related interfaces RS432 and RS485): cable lengths and noise immunity! USB is not designed for long cable lengths and I suspect it does not have the noise immunity of RS232, RS432, and RS485. Long cables are important for a *large* model RR system and noise immunity is important in the fairly 'noisy' model RR environment.
"K> "K> Not that I'm against USB - it has real potential, and the concept is "K> beautiful - a single interface standard for any and all electronic devices, "K> including TV, DVD player, etc. (Won't it be lovely to get rid of all those "K> RCA jacks and coaxial cables, eh?) But at present it's just not good enough. "K> "K> "K> Wolf Kirchmeir "K> ................................. "K> If you didn't want to go to Chicago, why did you get on this train? "K> (Garrison Keillor) "K> "K> "K> "K>
\/ Robert Heller ||InterNet: snipped-for-privacy@cs.umass.edu
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Reply to
Robert Heller
10/100/1000BaseT wireless *8->
Reply to
Paul Newhouse
From the computer to the DCC computer interface? How long can that need to be? I'm using a 3' cable that is more than long enough.
Reply to
SleuthRaptorman
While that is true, as well as everything everyone else has said. I've written enough RS-232 stuff from the old BBS days (Snarf Quest Network) to be sick of it. It doesn't really mater how standard it is. There are many very standard things that are obsolete (black and white TV). I am surprised how willing people are ready to accept and defend "Tyco" level computer stuff when the "Kato" level is right there if they would demand it.
Reply to
SleuthRaptorman
In article , Jon Miller writes
Last time I looked, DecoderPro was the only actual application of JMRI. But since my namesake asked about library schemes that's probably not a problem.
Reply to
Robert Pearce
Yes, key phrase "for what it does", and I repeat so is black and white TV, for what it does. A PC-XT is a fundamentally GOOD system for what it does too. A manual typewriter is a fundamentally GOOD system, in fact hard to beat for simplicity and ease of use, doesn't even need electricity!. A horse & carriage is a fundamentally... etc. etc... None of these things will truly ever be obsolete because they always work.
Lets say I find it obsolete and inadequate for what I want it to do, and really inadequate for what I want it to do in futuristic DCC systems.
Reply to
SleuthRaptorman
Try the Model Electronics Railway Group (MERG) - a UK-based outfit that I am sure will have something to interest you on their website
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Reply to
Bruce Fletcher
Hardly. I am a computer science professional and have written more RS-232 drivers for various applications (one being the original Adventure Net), than most people have used.
You must not have seen my long winded post in another thread concerning what I envision for the future use of computers and model railroading. I believe I compared today's DCC systems to a CP/M based IBM PC-XT. Actually, I don't even think USB will handle it and expect something more like ATM for DCC to be developed. I don't remember the thread name. I'll see if I can recall it from the headers.
Reply to
SleuthRaptorman

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